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Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.
Letters of Samuel McKittrick
Parts III and IV
Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.


"Brass Mounted Army"
Music by Dayle K.

McKittrick Letters Part I and II

McKittrick Letters Part V





Part Three
Private Samuel McKetterick
Company B, Allston's Company
First Battalion South Carolina Sharpshooters

It took very little time for General Walker to find a place for those fifty or so men he had pressed. They were sent in small groups to other units serving on the coast. In most cases, the names are incorrectly spelled, as was Mckittrick's. Therefore it is difficult for those looking to locate them with any certainty.


Camp Heywood March 8, 1863
Dear wife

I am permitted by a kind providence to enjoy good health considering the circumstances I feel fatigued having had a hard march on Friday and now on Guard on yesterday and lately get relieved. I seat myself to let you know how I am getting on. On last Thursday we received orders to march on Friday to (the) Combahee Ferry a distance of about 9 miles. We arose about 4 o’clock Friday morning and dispatched on scanty Breakfast I rolled up my bedding buckled on my Trappings containing 40 rounds of Ammunition together with my Beding Haversack Canteen and Gun making in all considering the distance a very decent soldier of burden about 8 o’clock we set out in quick time for this place. As we would march a distance of some three miles we received orders to Halt and stack arms Rest when each man chose his own position to rest some setting some prostate with their Knapsacks for Pillars dreading to hear the command “Fall In” But alas we could no(t) avoid it we arrived here about 1 o’clock. The country we passed by some fine rice plantations upon which are Princely dwellings and although once inhabited by Aristocracy the states of some retreats for the Bats and Owls Such is the disolation of this cruel and unjust war.

We are campt within 250 yards of the River Bank near a Battle which we will have to defend in case of attack. The River is navigable for Yankee gunboats in high tide about 40 feet of water. I am fearful we will have heavy guard duty to do here. We have to guard the negros that are working on the breastworks and our camp and I suppose will soon have to guard the Bridge on the River. If a Yankee boat ascends the river we will get the first shot as we are in front. You would not ask this day to be Sunday as there are about one hundred men at work on the Battery and many engaged in mending their Tents & C. Do you ask why is this all done I it is ordered done. I think there are many pretended Oxcens pulled out of the ditch. There was a call for 30 men from our ay to work on the Battery today thee was general dissatisfaction as we had been pushed for two days and having had little to eat some more they could not work on boiled rice alone. We have drawed a little meat for two days and our Rice and meat are always to scanty. We paid on yesterday $1.25 for a Miscovee Duck and $1.00 for a q doz. Eggs and got 2 small meals for 3 men so you see we are living But unfortunately all are eat up but one Doz. Eggs. I am very sorry the Confederacy can do no better by us if they could not board us they should have let us go home. The privates and non commissioned officers treat us kindly the officers I can tell you about if I can get home if not it will do you no good to know it. My dear I am sorry to say to you I know no more about my case than when I last wrote. I do not think that the officers at Pocotaligo intend to release any who were pressed. We must seek assistance from other quarters. Jas Ashmore received a letter from Col. J.G. Ashmore who says unless Gen. Walker releases men on just Affadavit he will have to sue out a Writ of Habeas Corpus to be signed by a Judge. I am fearful I will have that to do before we get off this must be done by a Lawyer. If I do If I do not get a hearing shortly I will pursue that course. I intend to get away from here if I can honorably.

The principles by which I am serving greatly aggravates my servitude. But I try to trust in God Hoping I will get through some way he can make the wrath of man to praise him I have to inform you that I have heard no Religious exercises since I camp (came) to this camp. There appears to be a few God serving men in this co. If this is a fair sample of the Confederate Army I fear the of our liberty has forever set. I received your letter of 26 inst I am to hear form you I have not since 26 ulto. I know you are doing the best you can. I am surprised that I do not get Mother’s Affadavit. Although I do nor know as it would be necessary. I will inform you how to proceed If I take a new course. Still direct your letters as you have done I know no more about the Battle yet. Tell R. Teague I received his kind letter in due time. I want all the children to be obedient to you and Mr. Teague and say their prayers. Jas Ashmore is well.

March 1 Dear wife I am well this morning I am leave to start this morning. I will have to start this in a few minutes. Is about sunup. Dear wife farewell your loving husband
Samuel McKittrick

Camp Heywood –

Combahee Ferry – located on the Combahee River south of Pocataligo – General Hunter (U.S.A.) was raiding up this river later this summer. For a look at the first raid in June of 1863 and the resulting fallout among the southern commanders, see The Civil War at Charleston, Ripley and Wilcox, page 50.

Jas. Ashmore – Private J.S. Ashmore served with 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company C, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863, Anderson and Greenville District, is also listed with First S.C. Sharpshooters, Company B. as James S. Ashmore. He was born in the Fork Shoals area of Greenville District, SC. He was a son of John Ashmore, Jr. (b. 1796). One of six brothers to serve the Confederate cause - Augustus Ashmore 1841 = Company B, Sixteenth South Carolina - George E. Ashmore, 1825 - 30 Nov. 1863, Co. I, 3rd SC Lt. Arty. D. James Ashmore, 1829, Co. H, 3rd SC Lt. Arty./Co. F, Hampton Legion (Inf.) John S. Ashmore, 1822-1900, Co. C, 3rd SC Reserves = William Henry Ashmore, 27 Dec. 1832-9 Dec. 1906, Co. K, 2nd SC Cav./Co. B, Cav. Bn., Hampton Legion - Pascal A. Ashmore, 1840, 1st Sgt., Co. F, Hampton Legion (Inf.) - There first cousin James D. Ashmore, Jr. (11/3/1837 - 10/17/1863) served in Co. E, 16th SC Infantry Regt.

Col. J.G. Ashmore – There is a Major John D. Ashmore, who would have more than a passing interest in conscription. He was the chief enrolling officer for Pickens, Spartanburg and Greenville Districts.

General Walker – General W.S. Walker

R. Teague – Robert League

Camp Heywood Captain Allston March 12th , 1863
Dear wife

I am in health through the blessing of God. I received you letter dated 2d Inst. and in reply I have to say that I am at a loss to direct you concerning the cotton I have seen no acts of Congress nor do I know anything about the market. But I think if is not pressed perhaps it might be better to hold on, but if there is any certainty of that you had better sell if can get a price about the Governments price. Be sure to ascertain the facts about it as there are many Speculators these days. We received a letter from J.W. Stokes last week he agreed to take our cases we have all employed him he said he could get any man off who could prove his age over 40 we have sent him our papers he said that Mothers affadavit was suffiecient in my my case. He also said he could have us discharged within 8 or 10 days after he got our papers. I hope he will succeed. We found it next to impossible to get Justice here and concluded to get off by some other resort. It has been my Fortune to approach within sight and hearing of the Enemy as you perhaps have heard a Gunboat hung on the bar in Broad River some 7 miles from here and was set on fire and a part of its contents destroyed. Capt. Elliott undertook to steel a march on them and bring the property away. He succeeded in the first attempt without molestation on yesterday morning a detachment with 2 Guns, left here about 4 o’clock to defend him in the 2d attempt I was on the number we arrived there and planted our Guns about 3 o’clock to await the approach of night. Elliott went out about sundown sized some of the contents and was returning when the Enemy commenced shelling us but it being dark and they not knowing our position or supposeing us to be retreating missed their aim. We retreated in good order without firing a gun or receiving any damage. We returned to camp about half past 3 o’clock this morning I saw the enemy tents and could almost speak to their pickets Capt. Elliott got a gun and perhaps some other things from the Boat not withstanding their watchfulness the like vessels are hard to catch asleep. My dear I am much worried about my late trip and disgusted with our treatment but I hope I shall soon be allowed to see you and the little ones at our now cheer(f)ul fireside. It will cost me some money but what Is the value of that when compared to my Sacrifice of all principle and Domestic Happiness. Do the best you can. I hope the Lord will overrule all my recent trouble for my good I cannot give you any directions about planting & C. I have no doubt but you are getting on well. I add no more, but remain your affectionate.

Samuel McKittrick

Samuel McKittrick was indeed pressed and his name misspelled on top of it. He is listed as a Private in Captain Joseph Allston’s Company B, First South Carolina Sharpshooters. His name is spelled Samuel McKetterick. The following letters date from his service with that unit in defense of the South Carolina coast.

J.W. Stokes – 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company B, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863, Greenville District

Captain Elliott – Captain Stephen Elliott – 1830-1866 – The son of a distinguished Episcopal Bishop, Elliott took the Beaufort Light Artillery to war. Elliott rose from Captain to Colonel based entirely on his service within the State of South Carolina. He commanded General Shank Evans old brigade after W.S. Walker also mentioned in this letters. He was seriously wounded at the Crater and returned to South Carolina and died following the war. On the morning of April 9, 1863 Captain Stephen Elliott engaged the Union steamer Washington on the Coosaw River. It was one of a number of actions that the Beaufort Light Artillery was engaged in during this time. However it was by far the most serious.

Captain Allston – Captain Joseph Allston – Company B, First S.C. Sharpshooters

It was during this time that General Hunter (U.S.A.) was making use of units like the First South Carolina (U.S.A.) to raid the rivers and loot the homes located close to them. Hunter raided near Bluffton and up the Combahee on June 2, 1863.

Camp Heywood Pocotaligo, March 18 1863
Dear wife

I am permitted by a kind Providence to enjoy good health. I received you(r) last kind letter of the 8th Inst I am glad to hear you are doing well as it is the only pleasure I enjoy is reading your letters and musing over the many pleasant hours I have enjoyed with you. Which I am fearful I will never be permitted to enjoy again. I try to trust in God Knowing that he will do things right. We are still here we are working on the breastworks here 30 men work every day as yesterday we had just got to work when the long roll was betten there was some keen firing in (the) direction of the island the captain supposing an attach had us to fall in the march the courier was sent out and brought news there was no demonstrations. The Yankees were only practicing so we did not leave camp. We know no more about a Battle now than we did a month ago. There were nine prisoners taken last week a Lieut. and 8 privates on the Island they were brought on to Pocotaligo yesterday. My dear wife I am sorry to inform you I know no more about my release than I did when I came here. It is very strange that we can get no hearing whatever in our cases I fully believe that all authorities here will do all they can to keep us here. If they do it will be against all rule of law and justice. But like Elford I fear we have many officers as void of principle as a hog is of a soutl. (soul). We have written to the Governor through Colonel McCullough. We described our conditon ub (in) full to him by letter he sent it on to the Gov. and also wrote one himself he thinks it strange that we are kept here and said he would do all he could to get us relieved. If we have to stay we want to be transferred to his Regt. But this I fear will be difficult to do as our officers will not be willing to give us up.

I hardly know what to say bout our carriadge (carriage) I think that unless you know where you can get another one of some kind you had better not sell it as the carriadge (carriage) as bad as it is looks better property than money. But however if you can sell and buy again I have no objections but to sell and lay up the money I do think bad business, unless you could do without one if you would go to Greenville or look round in the country you might do better if you go ahead. I suppose our carriadge is with harness & C. about $100.00 it is wning to how you can buy again everything is very high price now. A new carriadge will cost highly now do as you think best. I think if you find Congress has adjourned and done nothing about the cotton yall do well to buy at 20 cts per lbs. As cotton is better than money perhaps you can buy at that what money you will have to spare. You can have it brought home or put in safe keeping where it may be bought. But in this matter like the Carriadge I can not exactly limit you(r) course you must exercise your own judgement and counsel good more. I have heard nothing of Affadavit yet. It either has been mailed wrong or it has bee(n) misplaced, here or on the way either accidently or on purpose. I went to the Captain and enquired if he had got any such letter he said he had not. Two of my messmates got similar letters without any trouble. I should have put in a letter and sent to me not to the Captain. I think Duvall Surely knows this but perhaps he neglected to send to me and sent to my Captain if so I doubt ever seeing it. I write to him today and try it again I don’t think it nessessary for you to go Laurens again. I am sorry to put my friends to so much trouble but I cant help myself in this case Jas. Ashmore is well. I shall remain your loving husband till death. Samuel McKittrick.

Elford – Colonel C.J. Elford

Col. McCullough – Col. McCullough command the Sixteenth South Carolina. McCullough lived near McKittrick in the lower end of Greenville County, and served in the House of the State of South Carolina. He was a man with a considerable amount of power and wealth

Duvall - .probably L.J. Duvall – Company D, Ninth S.C. Reserves (Jun, 1862- Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

Camp Haywood, Pocotaligo, Beaufort Dist. March 27th, 1863
Dear wife

I seat myself this evening to commence a short season with you. I am well and all my mess are likewise well. This being Fast day Lieut. Capers ordered all unnecessary business stopt. We are generally Idle through not blessed with the priviledge of worshiping God publilicly. It is our misfortune to be place under ungodly officers who manifest no interest in Spiritual tings and set no good example before those over whom they are placed. Our company are mostly notoriously wicked and seem never to use the name of God except profanely. Thought there are a few study (sturdy) and I hope pious men among them. But they are almost like “Lotts in Sodam” yet I see some redeeming traits with some of them and I think if they had at least a moral Captain many of them might live a different life. They crow our tent at night to hear myself and tent mates sing spiritual songs. I received your favor of 22 and 23 last night at bedtime. It truly gratified me to hear you are doing as well as you are. My dear wife I have no assurance of a discharge yet not do I much expect to get away from my unjust and tryanical service unless I work my way through which many have advised us to do, as there is no law to us here so bring us back if out Gen. Walker’s Military Dist. We have waited patently for a hearing and get noon I received mothers affidavait on last Monday. I do not suppose that it or any other paper will d me any good. As military power when in the hands of unprincipled men recognizes no bounds. We intend to try a little longer to get justice and if we fail we will be tempted to take it ourselves. The remains of one our co (a Mr. Woodard from Edgefield Dist) was taken away from here yesterday to be sent home. He died from inflation of the brain with about four days duration. It was a solemn scene to behold the corpse taken from his bed of straw and placed in a wagon, denied even a coffin until it would get to the Dept. The inversed arms of the escort the dead march and slow roll of the drum all indicated of our uncertain and short stay upon the earth. I am willing for John to comply with Mr. Teague’s order tell John to go ahead and learn to write so he can read my letter. I think he can soon learn write. I cooks officer is “Reform Pickens Dist. Ala.” March 29th. Dear wife I am through kind Providence well this morning I have got relieve from guard and seat myself to converse a few moments with you, as my only consolation is that of the pen. I have no interesting news to give you. All is quiet here now, although we would not be surprised to hear the long roll. We are near the line of pickets and have couriers in our own camp to distribute news among other troops. Our Captain is in command of this post and battery. The breastworks here are not yet completed. We are working on them when we are not otherwise employed. We live hard, die hard, and sometimes work hard. But at all this I would not complain if I was here according to the laws of my country but to be assigned to the command of Aristocratic, Appointed and as I think unprincipled Officers grieves me awfully, and can get no hearing as a gentleman is beyond duration I am satisfied that we must get assistance from some other quarter than this if we (are to) get away from here. I try to bear up as well as I can hopping that I will get justice some day. Dear wife do the you can I know you have a hard time also. I can only samathize with you and receive the same in return. Were it not for the pleasing memories of my dear family which continually haunt my mind and which I hope one day to enjoy life itself would be a burden yet I know I am enjoying many blessings. It is raining hard here now I am now in my tent surrounded by seven mates on the same board. Mr. Smith is writing Captain Stone and Jas. Ashmore are reading, the others are generally sleeping. We are all quartered in a large sable (stable) or hotle tent which is ample for 8 or 10 men. I am fearful for you to know you will recollect that I declined sending you Elford’s letter some time ago fearing it might get misplaced on the way. But as I want you to see it so you and all your friends can judge of its merit I send you a copy of the letter and keep the original. I want you to keep the one I send and Mr. R. Teague, Ashmore or any other prudent friend can get a copy from you be sure not to lend it if they want to see it or draw a copy let them come and do it I send Capt. Roberts a copy Mr. Ashmore has requested a copy from me he can get one from you. Perhaps you can get some to lay off the corn from 40 inches one way and 5 feet the other or perhaps you had as well drill it about five feet. As I expect to change my office do not write until you hear from me again as we will likely move from here before a letter can come from you. Kiss all the children for me your husband. Saml McKittrick

Lt. Capers – E.Postel Cater was the Brevet Second Lieutenant of Company B, First Battalion of Sharpshooters.

Mr. Woodward – Wm. Woodward and J.M. Woodward are listed with Company B, First Battalion of Sharpshooters. There are two men by that name listed with the Jun 1862 - Jan 1863 Reserves. They are listed as Woodward, W. J., 2nd Lieutenant and Woodward, O. C., private. W.J is listed with Company F of the 11th Reserves and O.C. is listed with both Company E and Company F. No Woodward is listed in Broken Fortunes as matching the name as given and date of death given.

Mr. Smith and Capt. Stone– There are four men named Smith listed with Company B of the First S.C. Sharpshooters. They are Colsen, James, S.M., and W.L. Although the connection is tenuous, there are a number of Smith’s in Company C 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863, Anderson and Greenville Districts, among them Smith, A. H., Sergeant, Smith, Ezeikel, and Smith, W. P. There are also three men named Stone found in this company, Stone, J. K., Stone, James and Stone, Owen.

R. Teague – Robert League, see earlier mention

John – as John McKittrick, the oldest son of Samuel is often mentioned as being in school, this does not seem to refer to him.

Capt. Roberts – Capt. Later Col. T.B. Roberts

Mr. Ashmore –

“I cooks officer is “Reform Pickens Dist. Ala.” March 29th” - this is a reference to J.S. Cook from Pickens County Alabama – see later letter from Cook.

Camp Heywood, Captain Allston’s Sharpshooters, April 5, 1863
Dear wife

It is my pleasure to address with you here. I am in health as all my messmates are except Mr. Smith he has been and is pretty much confined to his ten with Rheumatism in his legs. I have not tome or news to write you I am on guard today and consequently confined I have to write in the intervals of my tours on post. Our officers are very strictly for the obeidance of the Army regulations even in small matters. They seem to try to keep their men in awe of them lest they should lose their control and perhaps lose the men to control. I received your very kind letter of 29 ult. And as usual was glad to hear you were all well I how I would like to enjoy this beautiful Sabbath day with you to dangle the precious little ones on my knee. I want you to keep them for me and tell them where and how I am doing. This painful and injust seperation from a family so near my heart grieves me sorely and I frequently lose almost all hope of ever seeing you again, and there a bright ray that crosses my path and I can almost imagine myself in the bosum of my family. It is not the fear of the evening that discontents me for if my peace is made with God and I had no dependant family I could almost welcome the hour that would terminate my unhappy existence My dear I will stop I feel that I am will stop I feel that I am perhaps wanting in faith and patience. O that both my may be increased I have seen no Minister of the Gospel since I came to this co and scarcely ever hear the name of God or Devil used except profanity you hardly believe how wicked many soldiers are.

We have had very cold wet weather a few days since it is now clear though pretty cool. Well you want to know how I am getting on in the way of a discharge I cannot tell you. We received a letter from Ery. (attorney) J.W. Stokes last Monday stating he had two cases in his hands and he felt confident of getting any man off who could prove his age over 40. We sent on to him the information. Captain Stone is looking for some affidavits from Greenville and as soon as they come we intend to make on more and final effort to get off and if we fail will try a Writ of Habeas Corpus. We are looking for an answer from him daily. I said to you in my last not to write to me again until you heard from me. I do not expect to change my office I want you to write on as before I am now sorry that I have delayed your letter. You are perhaps anxious to know when will have an attack. I tell you I think it doubtful whether we have an attack this Spring or not although we are liable to attack every day. We are held in readiness at all times. Our company have charge of this battery in which are three heavy guns we have given up the small field piece. Dear wife do as you thing best concerning the planting C & C I think you have done well in buying cotton. If you get any more money I think you would do well to purchase more if have not sold your jeans cloth perhaps you had better not sell it as I may need it as I may have to stay here in service. Capt. Allston is gone home and his company wishes he would never return. As our letters have to start early Monday morning I have (to) close on Sunday. I want the children to learn all they can and obey their mother in all things give my love to all enquiring friends. Your loving husband
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Smith –

J.W. Stokes -

Captain Stone –

Captain Allston – Captain, Company B, First S.C. Sharpshooter Battalion

Pickens County Ala August 1st, 1863
Dear Friend

I received your letter last Saturday and I was glad to hear that you was all well this leaves me and family well and doing the best we can I have no war news to write I have made 94 ˝ bushels of wheat and I have every good prospect of corn we have had rain plenty this year crops are fine hear and every where that I hear from I am going to start to see boys in a few days I shall be gone 3 weeks or upwards they are at Chattanooga everything is on corn, only high some hear some say that wheat will be $3.00 per bushel here oxen from $3.00 to $ 3.73 per yoke you requested me to keep you posted about that land if there is and (any) information you want (must?) write to me and I will send it if you sell it draw a deed and send it to me and I will go to the probate judge and make it good I will also send you work what to do with the money that is how to send it I don’t know whether a check would do or not but I will find out by that time I want you to write to me frequently anyhow my Carolina friends has all quit me and Mother sends you and your wife our best compliments.

J.S. Cook
To Eqr. Samuel McKittrick



Part Four
Captain Samuel McKittrick
Company K, McKittrick’s Company
First (1st) Regiment, South Carolina State Troops, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864
Colonel T.B. Roberts Commanding


Charleston Sept. 5th, 1863
Dear Mary

I take up my pen this morning to converse a few minutes with you. I am tolerably well this morning. I have just returned from drill I had the honor to command as First officer of the company of commissioned officers at drill this morning Col. Roberts acting as general commander Capt. Russell of Anderson and myself his subordinates. The Lieut. Col. (Hodges) commanded the non commissioned officers. We drill from half past 7 o’clock to 8 from 9 to 10 and from ľ of three to a quarter after 4 and then dress parade. Thomas Steen of Greenville has had hard work to get off and has not been able to make the trip yet he first wanted a substitute we could not receive that he has but (put) one into the regular army since he was drafted. He tried to get a transfer I could not grant him that. He has now sued our a writ of Heabes Corpus I suppose it will be sworn (served) on me today you cannot imagine the tricks that many take to get off. I intend that none shall (serve) only by legal terms who ought to remain here. I have no difficulty with my co as yet I endeavor to treat them right and make evy man do his duty. My dear this is a beautiful Monday morning. I suppose you are very busy gathering. O if I could only be with you and my dear children. May the Lord preserve you all and keep you under the shadow of his wings. I was permitted to enjoy a precious season on yesterday I had heard that their were to communion service at the 1st Presbyterian church in the city I set out it to be Dr. Forest’s church who preached an able sermon and then administered the sacrament he welcomed his brethren of the military whom he could recognize by our uniform. There is to be (a) night meeting every night this week held within 100 yards of our quarters. We have fine priviledges her but there are so many temptations many are vert (very) carekess (careless) abiyt (about) the one thing needful. I hope you have received the gifts from and saw Mr. Vaughn. The enemy are very quiet this day or two. I do not know whether we will remain her or not. My co are all able to be up. My dear I do not know how we could spend many better than by writing often your letters are consolations which nothing else can give. Kiss the children for me. Your loving husband. Samuel McKittrick

Col. Roberts – Thomas B. Roberts, Colonel - First (1st) Regiment South Carolina State Troops (Aug 1863 - Feb 1864) –

Capt. Russell of Anderson - Russell, Thomas H., Captain - 1st State Troops, Company A, (Aug 1863 - Feb 1864) - Anderson District.

Col Hodges – W. Lud Hodges, Lieutenant Colonel - First (1st) Regiment South Carolina State Troops (Aug 1863 - Feb 1864) . Hodges also served in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Thomas Steen – Private, 1st State Troops, Company K (Aug 1863 - Feb 1864) – Thomas Steen or a Thomas Steen is also listed as having served in Company D of the Holcombe Legion and Company C of the Seventh S.C. Cavalry.

First Presbyterian Church –

Dr. Forest –

Mr. Vaughn –

Charleston, S.C. September 16, 1863
Dear Wife

I take my seat this day to inform you I am well. We arrived her about five o’clock on Monday evening all safe the Regt. numbered about 700 men. We are now quartered in a large house about 50 yards long and 50 feet wide. Capt. Moses Fowler’s co. occupy on half and mine the other we are in the basement story and three companies are in the 2d story. The other five companies are quartered within some four or five hundred yards of us in a similar situation. The weather is very warm indeed we had a pretty severe time coming down. We are doing very well. John Howard is was elected 3 Lieut, he beat Andrew Foster one vote. The enemy have made no particular demonstrations they continually shelling our folks are shelling their fortifications I now every few minutes hear a gun. The citty (city) is almost deserted Foreighner’s soldiers and mulattoes compose the population. I have and still have the pleasure of seeing many of my Laurens friends and acquaintances among them Josiah and W. Leak Capt Sloan Turner Furgess and others. I have seen cousin Adam Sternes yet he called to see me but I did not see him. I bought 40 men I have no doubt you have heard how my company repudiaded substitutes. I will have to send all of them home 26 days from now. I hope you are doing well I am fearful the water will make us sick sistern water I can not drink. All my ee (men) are well the surgeon has not commenced examining any of the case yet. The Inspector Gen. Has let of some we are no rightly settled in here yet. We are within a few yards of the Charleston Hotell in the center of the city. I must close I am and have been very busy. Remember you loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

When you write direct you letter to Capt. McKittrick, Col. Roberts, Reg. 1st Regt. S.C. Troops

Captain Moses Fowler’s co. - M Fowler – Moses T. Fowler - M.T. Fowler – Fowler, M. T., 1st Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops Company C (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)- Moses T. Fowler is known as being the last man to occupy the lower half of Satan's pulpit or the clerk's place at Fairview Presbyterian. He died on March 24, 1889 and Married Amanda Richards, Born: April 13, 1841-Died: December 1, 1914. On page 246 of The Peden's of North American we find the following notation: Moses T. Fowler served nine months in the S.C. Militia during the War Between the States, Three months as First Lieutenant, then six months as Captain of his company; was transferred to Company E, Hampton Legion. This company of this famous legion was composed of at least two-thirds Peden Descendants. Moses T. Fowler was wounded in the shoulder at Riddle's Shop, Va. and surrendered with Lee. He like the father, John Peden, gave four sons to the Confederate cause, two on the altar of country. Robert A. Fowler, Company E, Hampton Legion - Killed at Seven Pines; John Thomas Fowler serving in the Second Louisiana, Jackson's Corps - Wounded at Second Manassas and Chancellorsville - Joined Company E, Hampton Legion. M. White Fowler serving with Company A, First S.C. Militia at the close of the war.

John Howard – Lt. John Howard served with McKittrick in all units but Company B of the First Sharpshooters

Andrew Foster – Andrew J. Foster - 5th South Carolina Reserves - Company G Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 - Spartanburg District

Josiah Leak – 5th South Carolina Reserves - Company I - Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 Laurens District

W. Leak – W.C. Leak - 5th South Carolina Reserves - Company I - Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 Laurens District

Capt. Sloan Turner Furgess –

Adam Sternes – Adam Stennis – brother of McKittrick’s wife.

Charleston Hotel –

Lieut Duvalls Tuesday Morning Minits past 8 o’clock Sept. 16 (No Year Given)
Dear wife

I am still here and hope through the blessing of Providence I am still mending. I cannot say that I am much stronger than I was one week ago I don’t have a high fevers nor am I hardly ever clear of some kind fever. We now think it is and (has) been an attack of Typhoid Fever. I have gone down in flesh and strength wonderfully not to (have) been in no more pain than I (have) been during my illness I still set up some half or perhaps less of my time. I rode from Sarah’s this morning on horseback I hope I am still mending though my disease may be deceptive I don’t think it safe to try to go home as soon as the middle of the week. I still hope I can go by Friday or Saturday I have been speaking of going in wagon in which I can and rest. If you are able and can have to come on Thursday or Friday I think I could go home. Bring some 2 or 3 grills and 2 pillars and I think you had better put in a bag of cotton between the seats or something else to level the bes so I could lay a part of my time for cannot set up all the way.

Lewis offers to take me but you can I would be poserful (powerful) glad to see you. If there is anything in the way, if you cannot come I hope to get home the last of the week anyway. Thought I cannot be sure that I will be able. Do not be alarmed bout me I hope I shall get well in due time. I should thank that it has not been worse with me. Im well attended to. I long to be at home I think I would mend a little faster if there. But we must submit to the will of him that will do right. Your affectionate husband
Samuel McKittrick

Lieut Duvalls – there is no lieutenant named Duvall listed in South Carolina service. L.J. Duvall as mentioned earlier served as a private in the 9th South Carolina Reserves, Company D, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863, Laurens District.

Lewis – maybe L.J. Duvall

The date on this letter is probably later in the month; however, I can find little to tie the illness mentioned to any date in this sequence of letters. Captain McKittrick does mention on the 21st that he is doing tolerably well, but this is not true indicator that his health has been bad.

Charleston Sept. 21 1863 Dear wife

I have just returned? a few minutes to give you the news and I am happy to inform you that I am well and have been so since I came down except a little bowel derangement caused I think from change of water and climate, and bile upon the back of my hand which is now getting well. We have had a pleasant time thus far although much excitement and bustle pervade the city. My company are all able to be up those who have applied for discharge or disability will likely be examined today. There are a great many applicants but few are getting off. I am sorry that so few will get off I see many retained who are unfit for duty. I had a pleasant time yesterday we are campt with in a few yards of a Methodist church of which Dr. Nightman is pastor. Some 200 soldiers attended yesterday I heard two good sermons one from Nightman and the other from Mr. Wood on last night our Chaplain (Rev. King from Anderson) held a prayer meeting of our Battalion their appears to many praying men in a Regt.

My company are dropping in daily. Soloman Robertson got here last night. My dear I would like to hear from you I have heard nothing form you since I left I hope soon to get a letter. I saw Brother James yesterday he came to my quarters he looks better than I ever saw him he is doing well. He has been in three battles and has not yet got scratched he appears cheerful he belongs to the Charleston Battalion Cousin Adam Sterones has paid me a visit he looks very well and is on duty. There is demand here for provisions bacon is worth about $2.50 per pound Butter I am told has sold as high as $5.00 per pound We can get our provisions cheaper from the commissary than we can buy them at home. We have bought nothing yet John M. Pedus is with us today and looks well and has been so ever since he came down I hope you are dong well with your fodder and molassed (Molasses) can (Cane), the weather is more pleasant today and yesterday

The enemy are quiet now. We cannot tell when they will break out again our troops are removed from Fort Sumter except a few who stay there mearly to keep the enemy from occupying the Fort the guns are all dismantled.

Sept. 22 Dear wife I still well no news this morning the enemy are very busty fixing up their fortifications George Blakely has got off I hope you you will be able to get a few pairs of shoes fixt up. Tell Mattox I want him to do his best make them out of the most pliant good leather. I have if it not so try and swap for some that is pliant if it cost something. I have given George the Instructions about the matter. I am getting on with my co finely I hope I shall have no serious difficulty with them.

Sept 23 Dear wife I am well this morning I have no news to give you I am very anxious to hear from you. We have drawn no arms yet. Harry and Pleasant Fowler and Joel Rector all came in last night Wm. Cox will get off I think I hope among hands you will be able to get your cane made up. I want your likeness when ever convenient to get and send it to me. I have written a letter to J.L. Peden letting him I can be at his sale. J.W. Peden was here on last Monday he looks very well has been well ever since he came down. There is great efforts making to get exemptions from service both by disability and legal claims the service is very heavy with many but I hope we will not wile in this service supper for provisions they draw.

I am kept generally very busy fixing up things. I have had but little time to to rest in daytime I have been drilling the company ever since last Thursday my company drill the (most) of any in the Regt. The most of them do the thing just right. I have make a considerable show when we go on Dress Parade we have to go up on of the main streets to the Citadel Green to be received every evening.

Give my best love to all inquiring neighbors and friends. Tell them all I have not forgotten. We had a Sermon in our Quarters last night by Chaplain. Remember me especially to Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore, J.M. Howard is well and elected 3rd Lieut. Josiah Bramlett is also well and doing well. Be sure me dear wife to write to me I want John Adaline Martha and Turner to be good children and say their prayer and prepare to meet me in heaven if I should never get home. Mind your ma say nor do no bad things. Farewell Dear wife and children for a while your loving husband and father.

Samuel McKittrick



Rev. King from Anderson –

Dr. Knightman –

Soloman Robertson – S.L. Robertson - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Adam Sternes –

John M. Pedus – If John M. Peden probably John McVey Peden, although there are other possibilities within the Peden house. John McVey was the oldest child of Scipio Peden and Martha McVey. John McVey Peden was born July 27, 1821 and died June 26, 1891. John M. was in Charleston at this time serving with Company H of the P.B.L.A. See later letters.

George Blakely - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mattox- John Mattox and his with Eliza are 49 and 47 years old and are neighbors of the McKittrick's living with a daughter Amanda

Harry Fowler - Fowler, H. H. – Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 – Also served in Company H of Third Reserves

Pleasant Fowler – Fowler, P. G. – Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 – Also served in Company F of the Third S.C.V.I.

Joel Rector - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Wm. Cox – There are several possible individuals including one who will serve in the First State Troops, Company G.

J.L. Peden - probably John T. Peden who was serving with P.B.L.A. at the time. John T. Peden – Although Mary Stennis’ sister Rebecca Eliza Stennis married John Tillinhast Peden. John Tillinhast is listed as being born in 1822 and having died in 1856. If this is the correct date of death, the only other possibility appears to be John Teasley Peden, the sixth child of John Peden and Elizabeth Ann Baker. He was born in 1810 and died in 1881. He married Margaret Foster in 1836. Two of his sons James W. and Samuel Reneau, who was born in 1852 are listed as dying in Confederate Service.

J.W. Peden – probably J.M. Peden - J.M Peden – John McVey Peden. John McVey was the oldest child of Scipio Peden and Martha McVey. John McVey Peden was born July 27, 1821 and died June 26, 1891. John M. was in Charleston at this time serving with Company H of the P.B.L.A. See later letters

J.M. Howard – See other entries

Josiah Bramlett – Corporal Josiah Bramlett - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Sept. 26, 1863
Dear wife

I very hastily write you a few lines to let you know how I am getting on I toberable well. Several of my company have got discharged and are going home tomorrow. I getting on I suppose very well. I believe my company drill the best of any in the Regt. and I suppose have not the worst Captain in the Regt. One of the old sharpshooters took dinner with me today he told me the company was about broken up that after we left they kept running away continually until they broke up the co. I cannot but feel gratified to hear that that good fortune has happened to the poor fellows. I was at one of the largest meetings last night appointed for soldiers the congregation was large and well behaved. It fell my lot to raise the tune for the congregation I never heard better vocal music to have so few female voices mingled with it we have fine priviledges but the temptations a large city has for soldiers. My dear I am very anxious to hear from you. I cannot account for receiving no news from you I cannot believe it is any fault of yours. George Blakely can tell you more than I have time to write. I yet hope to hear from you shortly. I feel somewhat depressed having had rather too much exercise. I hope my dear children are doing well It now bedtime I must close, give my respects to inquiring friends. Le us try to meet in Heaven if we should not in this. But I hope we will. I remain your loving husband until death.
Samuel McKittrick

George Blakely - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Sept. 27, 1863
Dear wife

I have just received the long wished for letter. Your letter was dated on Friday and received here this morning your letters gives me pleasure not withstanding some uneasiness about my dear daughter. But I hope the Lord will provide I am glad to hear you are doing so well you have saved a good deal of fodder. I think you need not sell Molasses yet. I hope you will get all the can made up. I am getting on very well. Although not so well today from bowel complaint I often a Catholic church today to see their mode of worship I am utterly disgusted with so much Supertition and Formality. We have fine priviledge to worship here so G. Blakely starts home to night I wanted to give you the news today.

All my company are tolerable well so as to be up several of them start home to night I want you to see Blakely he can give you the news. Try and pay your Taxes as soon as they will take the money. I know not when I will get to come home if you get and news from Moses he came to let me have it more tonight. Half 2 o’clock P.M. Lieut Fan says his wife has requested to him to tell me to request you to hunt him up and take your butter to her and she will give you the market price. I want you to accomadate her so far as you can as she bestood favors, on me before I left Greenville to enquire for Mrs. Bird. Fan I want ro attend church this evening be sure to write often remember your husband tat a Throne of Grace. you bore from haunting reason, but must to be content. Read all my letters to our dear children your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

G Blakely – George Blakely – Private, 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Lieut. Fan – Lt. W.R.B. Farr – First Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 Detailed to Commissary Dept. (MR) - See Company B, Third State Troops(6/62-1/63), listed as W.R.B. Faff -Farr, W.R.B., Third Reserves, Company B - Farr, W. Burwell, Company A and K, Sixteenth South Carolina

Charleston, October 6, 1863
Mrs. Mary McKittrick
Dear wife

I very unexpectedly by I suppose address you as I only on yesterday. But as Mr Thackson and Hellett are going home tomorrow I have concluded to write you would like to hear every opportunity.

I am by the mercy of God well I am getting on very well J. Howard and myself want you and his wife to fix up a box of Provosions as follows he is to have the box made you will send about one bushel of sweel (sweet) potatoes, one gallon of molasses and one peck of dried fruit and you and Mrs. Howard think we can send butter safely send about 2 pounds of that and my (any) other nicknack you please to send we do not want any meat we can buy that from the commissary and fresh meat would spoil. Mr. Howard will have a trunk brought down. I want you if you can get any colored dine check for a shirt to make and send me one as my old linen one will soon be worn out, and most of the other captains wear fine shirts and my white ones get so dirty so quick one dozen candles they sell here for 60 to 70 cts. per piece. I hope that you will get my new shoes put them in the trunk also if I had a fine white shirt it would do very well. I hate to Trouble you my dear but I know this trouble will be pleasant to you.

I hope you are getting on very well I send John Adaline and Martha a Testament which I want them to begin and read clear through. Remembering it is their Duty to read the Bible and also that I sent it to them to read. I got them for 25 cts. apiece soldier’s price they are beautiful books. You can see Mr. Thackson and Hellett they can tell you all about me they cannot tell anything bad I think I want you to send me by them any word you widh (will). Be sure to write often of the pleasure a letter gives a poor soldier. I long to see you and hope I one day will enjoy that happy privilidge. I know you all (are) burdened with care and trouble but try to Trust in God who can deliver you. I was at a meeting last night we had a large Audience there is to be meeting every night this week at the same church. Try and train the children as for God. Do not let them sure at large with all sorts of company it is better to insult people than God and ruin our dear children. I do not know how you are to manage if the old place is to sold keep me posted on the subject. If you have any money send bu (by) Thackson 20 or 25 dollars. My dear wife remember me at a throne of Grace Kiss the Dear children for me tell them tp (to) read my new Testament your loving husband until death.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Thackson – probably H.S. Thackston – Private - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mr. Hellett – probably J.M. Kellett – Sergeant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864. There is also a James Kellett that served as a Sergeant in Company A of the Third Reserves

Turner and Jeffy were probably too small to be thought in need of a Testament, but I have wondered, if they wondered in later years. I have also wondered where these books are today, and if anyone knows how valuable they once were.

Charleston Barracks October 10th, 1863
Dear wife

I received your kind letter this morning Two days later than I should have received it. It give me pleasure to hear from you and my dear children and how you are getting on so well. I am well and geeeting (getting) on very well. I have no special news to give you. All are tolerable quiet here now. I was glad to hear from Miss and I will answer Adam’s immediately. I see from his letter that the old homestead will not be sold soon, well I hope it will all work right. You perhaps can do better where you are until I get home if I should ever come. You wish to know where to sew Rye I want you to sew the piece on the left as you go down the lain below the Turnip patch you ought to sow it as soon as you can. I have no idea where I got the 20 dollar bill nor do I remember giving her the bill. But I suppose I did. I want you if you cannot pass it to send it to me by Thackson you will have gotten my letter by him ere this time. I am always thinking about them. I know they would be pleased with their Father’s likeness poor things may the Lord preserve them

I am sorry to hear that John Anderson is badly wounded Cousin Adam told me that Thomas had informed him indeed he showed me the letter that John had passed home wounded. Our meeting was dismissed on last night until tomorrow there appears to be considerable interest felt (W.H. Hovey) got down this morning and is trying to get off. There is no holding such men in service the most of those courthouse fellows will get off one way or another. J.R. Snow starts home tonight on furlough to work for the government.

Monday morning Oct. 12, 1863 Dear wife I am well this morning hoping you are the same I gratified to hear from you through Mrs. Farr and also a fine lot of butter which is very acceptable. Wm. Bayne and John Smith brought the things to us. I dismissed my substitute on yesterday and they went home last night. I hear Carr is on the way. I started a letter to Adam on yesterday.

My dear wife do the best you can and I will try the same I was not at meeting last night not being very well the meeting is to go on all this week at night. I think it likely that we will stay here our term of service I saw my old friend Murell of the Sharp shooters yesterday the co is on James Island now. Tell all the dear children to be good and mind their ma Kiss little Jeffy for me your loving husband
Samuel McKittrick



Adam of Miss – Adam Stennis – Adam Turner Stennis was the older brother of Mary A Stennis, the wife of Samuel McKittrick – He was born on September 3, 1819 and died on May 6, 1878. He married Julia Edwards and appears to have removed to Bailey, Mississippi. It also appears from this entry that he controlled the family property in Fairview.

John Anderson – John Stennis Anderson – oldest son of Rachael Stennis and James Anderson – J.S. Anderson was born April 2, 1842 and died without issue July 21, 1866. Rachel was the older sister of Mary A. Stennis. John Stennis Anderson – Born April 2, 1842 and Died July 21, 1866. Died without having married. Served in the Third Battalion or Laurens Battalion, Company C as a Sergeant. He was wounded at Chickamauga serving with Kershaw’s Brigade

Cousin Adam –

Thomas – possibly Thomas Carlisle Peden – He was serving with the Company H of the P.B.L.A. in Charleston at this time and would join Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina during the Atlanta Campaign. He is mentioned later in these letters and is a relative of Mary A. Stennis

W.H. Hovey – Private, 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Wm. Bayne – Corporal, 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

John Smith – J.B. Smith – Private, 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Carr - Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant, 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Murrell of the Sharpshooters – B.L Murrell served in Company B of the First Battalion S.C. Sharpshooters and also in Company K of the Second Artillery, and Company F of the Twenty-Seventh Infantry.

Charleston Barracks October 14th 1863
Mrs. McKittrick Dear wife

Not being very much pressed at this time at this hour I have concluded to write you a line or so. I am well this morning and getting on very well. I heard from your through Mrs. Fan she sent you butter which was quite a treat. We received some light bread and some 4 or 5 perhaps more pounds of butter. Mrs. Fan stated that you had been there and John Anderson was improving. I hope you have made an agreeable on acquaintance with Mrs. Fan I find her husband to be a perfect gentleman as a messmate. One of his negros arrived on Monday morning to cook for us. So you have sent your butter on you need not send anymore in the box by Thackston as I know it is hard to get. Besides you need it at home you need not say anything about this to any person but put in the other things and inform Mrs. Howard that you sent you butter with Mrs. Fan. I hope you have the shoes I hope to get a letter for you tomorrow morning. It gives me so much pleasure to hear from you I doubt there will be but little fighting here soon. Our meeting is still going on last night there were about 12 or 15 inquirers Cousin Adam was well on Monday morning. I hope you will get your wheat soon. Be sure to soak and cleanse your seed you know the trouble of smut. Give my love to all inquiring friends. Tell Mr. Ashmore I will write to him shortly. Tell Turner and Jeffy and all rest to be good children. I hope I one day embrace you all in sweet fellowship. Your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Mrs Fan – Mrs. Farr wife of Lt. Farr

Thackston -

Cousin Adam -

Mr Ashmore - - W.T. Ashmore and his wife Nancy, neighbors of the McKittricks.

Charleston Barracks Oct. 18th 1863
Dear Mary

Another beautiful Sabbath has dawned upon me in good health. I have just returned from the Hospital from seeing J. Hammett I do not believe he is much better I fear he is in a dangerous condition. Yet I hope he will recover I am getting on finely here I have no heavy duty to do I get to sleep every night and that you know suits my disposition very well. There are no officer of the day required here consequently I am not exposed. You wish to know where to sow Wheat I want you to sow the field above Mr. Fowler’s or the big field I think you would do well to hall and scatter manure over the poorest places of it they can tell the poor places by the small stalks. The piece on the left of the lain will be enough to sow in Rye. If any Body will rent the field next to Mattox let them have it. Try and get you sown in the right way you must try and get a god sower.

You want to know what to do in Rose’s courtship. I suppose you had as well het her marry as it seems she can get no other chance I enquired of Clark Sloan he said to try and find out his character and if is bad banish him at once and if not do as you think best. But if they marry just plainly tell him that Rage (Rose) marries but one of Dr. Hutson’s boy that they are not to come and if they do he must quite himself you must be Boss among them yourself. I omitted in the proper place to tell you that I received your letter of the 12 and 13 inst. I need not here repeat the pleasure it always gives me to hear from one whom I love above all worldly and I fear above Heavenly objects. This beautiful Sabbath and all the show noises and turmult of a large city cannot dispel you from me mind. Your pleasant company your lovely form haunts my vision which I hope one day to realize. Our meeting is going on five joined the church on Friday night 2 the Methodist and 3 Baptist I intent to go this evening or tonight or both. I answered Brother Adam’s letter I received on yesterday from John Anderson he is improving and all the family are well his letter was rather in answer one I had sent to his Mother. I sent one in last week to Uncle Adam and one I wrote on yesterday to Mr. Ashmore. Tell my old friend Teague and Burditt they have forsaken me perhaps they have good reason for so doing give them my best love and all other inquiring friends I hope to receive some tokens of love from you on Tuesday by Thackston and Kellett Kiss My dear children for me and remember me at a throne of Grace and write often to your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Rose – one of two female servants living in the McKittrick home.

Clark Sloan –

Dr. Hutson –

Brother Adam – Older brother of MckIttrick’s wife, Mary Stennis.

John Anderson – probably John Stennis Anderson – oldest son of Rachael Stennis and James Anderson – J.S. Anderson was born April 2, 1842 and died without issue July 21, 1866. Rachel was the older sister of Mary A. Stennis. J.S. Anderson served as the Captain of Company I, 11th South Carolina Infantry and also served in Company A of the same regiment.

Uncle Adam –

Mr. Ashmore –

Teague – Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third

Burdet – D.W. is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as David Wilcott Burdett, he will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves. B. Wm. Burdett is the older brother and is listed as 16 in the 1860 census he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Thackston – Private - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864.

Kellett- Sergeant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864. There is also a James Kellett that served as a Sergeant in Company A of the Third Reserves

Charleston Barracks October 21, 1863
Dear wife
I drop a few lines to you I am by mercy of God tolerably well. I am rather on the puny list but I hope I will be all right within a day or two. Mr. Thackson arrived all safely with the good things form home which I assure you was quite a rich treat as we were getting scarce of almost every thing when they arrived we had a jolly time when we opened the boxes and found manh dainties for Dainties they are in camp. I found in my letter $25.00. The shirts all came safely I am pleased with them, but most of all the Image of one whom I held Dearest of all woman kind saluted my eyes. I am much pleased with it it is a stricking likeness of you I found no trouble to get a case to fit it the same man that drew mine let me have a case for 5 dollars. I would not part with it under no consideration the case and gilt adds much to it beauty. You wish to know what to do about selling my more cattle. If you have food enough hold on to them and everything else as they cannot press my provisions while I am in service. Or if you sell anything be sure to get all you can. Remember to wash (watch) these speculators if you sell anymore. I think you perhaps had better sell the beef and keep the hide as leather will be such an object your molasses they will press get the customary price they are worth 8 dollars here. I would advise not to sell any more Molasses now as you do not need the money perhaps I can get them shipped down here. In a word watch the prices I know you do the best you can and I am satisfied. Exercise you own judgment I want you to sow the field as I directed in my last letter. I hope you will have corn enough to do you.

I am well pleased with my shoes they fit me well such shoes would sell for some 25 or 30 dollars. Fine shoes are selling here for 60 dollars Boots 100 to 120 Dollars so you see your cow hides is worth something. I sent you a paper of pins by William Bayne he said he would send him to you you can get them by calling at Grady’s Store I had to pay one Dollar. Mr. Vaughn is mistaken somehow about the price the sell a Dollar to 1.25 per paper. Needles are selling 75 per paper if you want some I can send you a paper in a letter then 25 in a paper that is 3 cts a piece. I am glad to hear that the children are getting on so well in their Testaments John will soon be through perhaps I can get some more pretty books when they through these they have. I have purchased a Testament for Margaret Simpson I could get none like I got before the seller said many complained of their size. The will have no more of that sort the one I send is just as good I will send home tonight by Tillman Hughe’s Black Boy who will start home tonight perhaps he can take it to John Howards or send it to you somehow. I present this book to Margaret give my respects to Mr. Stoke’s Family. There are many men being discharged for Disability and many more from other causes. They have reduced me co. powerfully we would not take substitutes and those village gentry have nearly all got off one way or other. It is all right we will not be troubled with them nor their substitutes. The less men I have the less trouble I will have. I wrote Squire Thompson a letter the other day.
Your loving husband
Samuel McKittrick
To Mrs. Mary McKittrick

Mr. Thackston - Thackston, H. S., Private -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

John -

Margaret Simpson -

Tillman Hughes –

William Bayne – Bayne, William, Corporal -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mr. Vaughn –

John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mr. Stokes – there is a letter from a member of the Stokes family in this correspondence.

Charleston Barracks October 24, 1863 Mrs M.A. McKittrick

Dear wife I hastily drop you a few lines to let you hear from me I am now tolerably well I have been quit poorly for some few days but I now feel nearly right I was a little fearful I was going to have a spell of fever but I hope it will pas off Mr. Howard is improving I hope though very weak yet. The General has issued orders to let all the farmers go home on twelve day furlough to sow their wheat and gather crops they are allowed to go at three times one thing start tonight and when they return another third go and then the other third. I feel it to be my duty to wait for the last draft. So my time will com about the 20th of next month to see you ma (may) the Lord preserve you and my dear little ones and me to a happy union. None are allowed to go but farmers. Lieut Fan cannot go T.L. Feraler (Fowler) goes this time, John Howard the next, and I the next. As I am Capt. It will not work well for me to go before the company. I think this a favor to the Regt. I omitted to tell you that I unexpectedly received a present of a good twilled checkered shirt from a friend before yours came down. I am well satisfied with the shirts I will sell one or two I have received as a present 2 fine combs since having one the other I send to you and 3 pens. I suppose I can get about 38 dollars for the shoes you sent me now I charge you to save the leather all you can. And if you can get Mattox to make one or two pair made about the size of mine or one number less I can sell them for 35 or 40 dollars a pair. But if you cannot spare the leather do not do it. I will get home and it will be time enough the weather will be cold then. If you need anything from here perhaps I can send or bring it. Hold on to your things till I get home. Mr. Simmons can tell you how we are getting on. I send my fine shoes I want you to get Mattox to hal (half) sole and fix them up and send them back by Simmons and Tanner as I can wear them before it gets cold and ease my others. Mattox knows how to fix them give my respect to Mrs. Mattox and tell him I write to him within a few days Go head and sow your wheat and when I get home I will have nothing to do but set and rest and talk to you. I know you can have it done right if you can get it sowed no more at present but remain your loving husband until death.

Samuel McKittrick
I have sent the most needy hand home this time.

Mr. Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

The General –

Lieut Fan – Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

T.L. Feraler – Fowler, T. L., 2nd Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mattox - – John Mattox and his with Eliza are 49 and 47 years old and are neighbors of the McKittrick's living with a daughter Amanda

Mr. Simmons – Simmons, M. L., Corporal-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Tanner – Tanner, Carter, Private-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Barracks Anson Street October 29, 1863, Mrs. M.A. McKittrick
Dear wife

I am by the great mercy of God well today having as I trust recovered from my little spell of a few days pass. I am now doing Duty there are several of my co. complaining Mr. J. Hewitt I think is no better I am very fearful he will not live he is growing very weak his bowels are not regulated yet and his glands are badly swollen. Lieut Fan has been unable for duty for a week but not very bad off Andrew Forester is poorly though not very sick. I received your kind letter this morning you can imagine the pleasure it gave except hearing that you were rather poorly. I find you are doing very well you no doubt have seen Simmons before this time your corn has surely turned out well you want to know how much the crib holds it will hold up to the boards about 170 bushels but it would not measure out perhaps that much of good corn. as gagering supposes all the corn to to be good. I suppose you would be safe in saying or giving 150 to 155 bushels. If they do not want your corn let this matter alone as I hope to get home before long and assist you. I received you gloves but forgot to mention them in my last they are fine indeed. As I had received a good new checked shirt I sold the big checked one you sent me for eight dollars. We are now quartered in a fine house we have ample room for all the co. and there are 6 fine places to the Dwelling house and 3 or 4 kitchen places it is one the best places in the city for soldiers they people here are generally opposed to soldiers going into their houses but the companies have generally gone in without their consent as that could not be easily gotten. the man who owns my house has not called on me in person yet to give up his house nor he need not do so for (nothing) short of an order from the commanding General will remove me from this house. Strange indeed that we must be in (an) old warehouse without fire and to protect their property and yet not be allowed to go into an empty house. One of the Generals aides have just called to inspect our Quarters I told him when asked if I had permission of (the) owner of the house no but I had to have some place for my mess. He did not complain. David Peden and Wm. Hopkins took supper with me last evening on their way from home to their company Hopkins brought me a letter from Uncle Adam he thinks we had better sell the old place but if we do not he will sow down where he has in corn. If we do not he will sow down where he has in corn. if we do not which I suppose it will not work well to force the place into sale we had better let him have it to sow. As I wrote to you before do not well (sell) anything under price as nothing sells to high now it appears I do not need anything from home now either in clothing or Provisions. I only want to see you and my dear little ones. I am reather surprised at M. Fowlers children joining the Baptist church. But I suppose there is cause for it. Give my love to all inquiring friends and write often to your loving husband. My old friend Jones has got here from Pickens.

It appears that Captain McKittrick was not concerned about the quartering issues that were a part of this country’s independence movement.

Mr. J. Hewitt –Hammett, J. R., Private-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Lieut Fan - Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Andrew Forester - Forester, A. J., 1st Sergeant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Simmons – Simmons, M. L., Corporal-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

David Peden – D.M. Peden served in the Sixth Cavalry, Company A and it is possible that he also served in Company E of the Hampton Legion and Company C of the Third Reserves. It is also possible he served with the First Cavalry in Company B. David M. Peden is the son of Thomas Alexander Peden and Jane Boyd. He was born February 18, 1841 and married first Elizabeth Boyd and had a single child. He married as his second wife Sarah Jane Cox who was born circa 1845 and died September 12, 1892, they had ten children and relocated to Colhutta, Ga. His third wife was Rachel E. Humbert or Hughes and he departed this life on July 16, 1916. Like Mary Stennis, he is from the House of Alexander and is listed in the Peden’s of North America, page 318

Wm. Hopkins - W.L. Hopkins is listed as serving in the Sixth Cavalry, Company A as a Corporal

Uncle Adam - Adam of Miss – Adam Stennis – Adam Turner Stennis was the older brother of Mary A Stennis, the wife of Samuel McKittrick – He was born on September 3, 1819 and died on May 6, 1878. He married Julia Edwards and appears to have removed to Bailey, Mississippi. It also appears from this entry that he controlled the family property in Fairview.

Jones from Pickens –

M Fowler – Moses T. Fowler - M.T. Fowler – Fowler, M. T., 1st Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops Company C (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863) - Moses T. Fowler is known as being the last man to occupy the lower half of Satan's pulpit or the clerk's place at Fairview Presbyterian. He died on March 24, 1889 and Married Amanda Richards, Born: April 13, 1841-Died: December 1, 1914. On page 246 of The Peden's of North American we find the following notation: Moses T. Fowler served nine months in the S.C. Militia during the War Between the States, Three months as First Lieutenant, then six months as Captain of his company; was transferred to Company E, Hampton Legion. This company of this famous legion was composed of at least two-thirds Peden Descendants. Moses T. Fowler was wounded in the shoulder at Riddle's Shop, Va. and surrendered with Lee. He like the father, John Peden, gave four sons to the Confederate cause, two on the altar of country. Robert A. Fowler, Company E, Hampton Legion - Killed at Seven Pines; John Thomas Fowler serving in the Second Louisiana, Jackson's Corps - Wounded at Second Manassas and Chancellorsville - Joined Company E, Hampton Legion. M. White Fowler serving with Company A, First S.C. Militia at the close of the war.

Charleston Barracks Anson Street October 30, 1863
Dear Mary,
As Mr. Bramblett is going home I send a few lines although I wrote to you yesterday. I know it is a pleasure to hear from me I am well this evening. Mr. Hammett died about 8 o’clock last evening I send Bramlett in charge of his remains to Greenville. Oh what sad news to his wife and children I have sent his wife a letter also stating his condition while sick if you hear of it in time I want you to go to his Burial. Poor man I hope he is much better off he appeared to bear his illness with Christian patience the day before he died I have him to understand that I though his case doubtful and told him he had time to think of spiritual matters. U inquired if had found Christ “Precious” with a whisper and nod of the head he replied yes I endeavored to lead his mind to the Lord. I hope it is all well with him. I sympathaze with his bereaved family The rest of my co are all able to be up Col. Williams Regt. leave here today for Greenville and I would not be surprised if we are ordered there within a few days also although the prospect is fair for a naval attack there are almost constant firing and average of about 675 or 700 per day and night even now the window panes are made to rattle with the noise of the cannon but we pay very little attention to it. I suppose some ten or 12 have fired since I commenced writing this letter about 15 or 20 minits. I hope you are doing well I think I am about well again. Lieut. Fan is still poorly Josiah Bramlett can tell you all about things here I hope you will see him. Be sure to write every chance to your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Bramblett - Bramlett, Josiah, Corporal -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mr. J. Hewitt –Hammett, J. R., Private-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Col Williams Regt. - James Henderson Williams, Colonel, 5h South Carolina Reserves, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Lieut Fan – Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Barracks Anson Street Nov. 1st 1863 Mrs. Mary McKittrick
Dear and beloved wife
Although I do not hold with letter writing in the main on the Sabbath yet I hope there is no harm in merely writing to ones companion I always feel when at leisure like writing to you it is the greatest pleasure I have in camp to write to you and read your letters I am only sorry I receive no more from you yet I do not complain. This day seems to bring with it solemnity I read 7 chapters in the Testament and then went to worship to a Presbyterian Church and came back took dinner. What do you suppose we had for dinner we bought one quart of sweet milk for 50 cts. and made fried fruit dumplings having milk to sweeten. I tell we had a fine dinner although we are out of meat nor can we get any Bacon from the commissary atall nor no Beef till about next Tuesday. We would have to pay $3.00 per pound for Bacon in the city. Lowery Fowler is to bring us some Bacon when he comes I charge you if you have any more than you need to be sure to hold on to it. Just think of giving $3.00 per pound here. The yanks are going ahead Burning Sumpter but to but little effect as yet. The very city and even the Ground is almost made to quiver under the noise of their heavy Guns But strange to say there is no more attention paid to it than if it were at Greenville Village. And if the Enemy break in here the Inhabitants will be something like the antediluvians were when Jonah named them of the Flood thou will not believe it until the shells are in among them and besidst I believe that three fourths of the Inhabitants here now would rather the Yankees were here then we there are few here besidst foreigners, Free Negroes and the very lowest class of Population there are a class of females here that almost disgrace their very sex. But thou God I have kept clear of them. I feel thankful that I have a virtuous wife Capt. Russell of Anderson Dist. Who is an elder in our church has just called and gave me copy of the Southern Presbyterian Capt. Russell is and excellent man. Monday Nov. 2

I am quite well today the Yankees are still booming away at Sumpter. They throw about 1100 shells at the fort within 24 hours. Two men were killed on last Saturday by the shells and Thirteen were killed by the falling of a portion of the wall of the fort. The enemy seems determined to take the fort. We are expecting the President (Davis) here tonight. We went out today about 12 o’clock to escort him. We mistaken in the time of his arrival. He is to arrive here this evening at 5 o’clock. I suppose we will have a grand display here tonight. There are a committee of some 70 citizens to welcome him into the city. I am anxious to get a peek at him myself. I have just ordered 50 pounds of Beef for our mess for the present month. We get it in small quantities as we want it.

My dear wife I hope I shall see you within a month. I want to go home with the last and 3 file of farmers that go home. Lieut. Fan I suppose will go home on sick furlough. Tell John Adaline and Martha to be good children and soon get through their Books. I was at Prayer meeting last night I expect to go again tonight it is held among the Regt. My dear do the best you can and remember me at a throne of grace kiss Jeff and Turner for me your loving husband.


Presbyterian Church –

Lowery Fowler - Fowler, T. L., 2nd Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Sumpter – Fort Sumter -

Captain Russell of Anderson District – Thomas H. Russell, Captain, Company A, 1st State Troops, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Lieut Fan – Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Barracks Nov 9th 1863 Mrs. M.A. McKittrick
Dear wife
I am by the Mercy of God in fine health. This is a beautiful day of if were my happy lot to be with you this beautiful Monday morning to enjoy the presence of my lovely family and sow my wheat and attned (attend) to many other things and thereby relief my dear wife from the arduous duties which devolve upon you in my Absence. I can only pity you at the present hoping for a better day.

We are getting on finely here now. The Yankees have almost seaced firing for the last 30 hours. The spirits of our people are reviving concerning the fort of this city. I begin to think there is a chance for Charleston to stand. My men arrived here safely on last Saturday morning you can imagine my feelings on receiving intelligence by fancy as well as by letter. My shoes and C. Simons told me a fine story about you and all; true as preaching I hope. He saw you and my dear little ones at your own fireside I learn you are doing well by your own letter. My brothers letter gave me pain to think he is so unreasonable and inconsistent he has run clear off the track. I am at a stand whether to pay any attention to his letter or not. If he acts the fool I should not I wrote a letter on Saturday to send to you by John Howard expecting him to get home last night with an officer from every co in the Regt. But lo and behold when their went to the General they were all Disapproved and no commissioned officer who was well get to go home. They were all very much disappointed as they had every thing about ready to start the other went on I hope it will all work right in the end. I think the officers will get furloughs within a few days. Col. Rhett is acting Gen. Now and I think that he wants to do something extra our Col inquired of him into the matter he replied that instead of sending officers to bring the men back he would treat them as Deserters who did not return. A want of punctuality both officers and privates in returning to camp I believe has in part at least caused this prohibition. I am now compelled to say to you I do not know when I shall get home I hope before a great while though not as soon as informed you I would before and it may happen so I will not be allowed to go home until the term is expired. I have learned to some Degree to endure disappointments in this world. It was made my Solemn duty on yesterday to assist in burying a brother Captain who had been lost for weeks in the Torpedo Boast he and 7 other went down to rise no more in life in a small boat some month ago the was found the bodies taken our the captain was buried yesterday the other will be today. I suppose I with 2 other Captains from our Regt. And 3 more from the 26th Regt. appointed to hear (bear) the corps (corpse) to the grave or in other words to attend to the corps (corpse) we met at the Mills house Hotel were the corps (corpse) was with one fine company of Infantry and many other both officers solider and citizen no. 6 her (hearse) his body to the horse the co after paying the usual honors commenced in dead tones they followed by the horse on each side of which were 3 Captains of whom I was one and we followed by a crowd (of) spectators and to this beautiful Sabbath evening the Scene was sublimely solemn. It was about 4 miles to the cemetery after we got out of the city we finished carriages to the burying ground the burial services was performed by a Episcopalian priest after which 3 rounds were fired by the co.

C. Simons - Simmons, M. L., Corporal - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

brother –

John Howard – John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

the General –

Col Rhett – Col Alfred Rhett – First South Carolina Regulars

Mills House Hotel – a well known institution in Charleston

Twenty-sixth South Carolina Infantry Regiment - Brief History of the 26th South Carolina Vols

Charleston Nov. 14th 1863
Dear wife
By the blessing of heaven I am well this morning. I am getting on very well there was very heavy firing last night and night before. I have purchased 2 papers of needles for one dollar each paper you can let Mrs. Mattox have one paper and you can keep the other one. They will sell here before long I think for 10.00 per paper. Jean cloth would sell here for 15.00 or perhaps 20.00 per yard. If I get home I can bring it down. I want you to sew the field in wheat next to Mr. Mattox as it had been tended 2 years in corn. As I do not know when I will get home you go on with business. The big field on the Lane and the Mattox field will be enough to sew in wheat.


Sunday Nov. 15th Dear wife I am be the mercy of God well I have lately eaten a good Breakfast composed of cake bread fried Pork Sausage eat and sweet bread John Howards wife sent him some of these things by Wm. Gilbert. Lt. Fan started home last night for 12 days. The enemy have ceased firing this morning I suppose they have only let go to catch a better hold. I went down to (the) wharf last night and looked at them firing I could see them then shells distinctly like balls of fire thrown into the air. My dear I knew you will feel much disappointed at my not coming home. When I wrote to you I would but be of good cheer I would likely come yet. And if I should come I can tell you I have a very time. My company brigade small I do no drilling and I am officer of the day about every 8th day so I have a fine time of it now if you and my dear little ones keep well and myself I can do until the time is out. I am going to Athens a Presbyterian church today I want to try and do the best I can. I sent Uncle Adams Steven’s a letter last week informing him to sew and have sown all the land on the old place in wheat. I think that nobody ought to live in the house. The lands will do as well or better some and besides we ought to have same in corn the place. You and Robert can attend to this matter uncle Adam wants to sow wheat where he had in corn. I think I am getting on the trail to get my wages from Capt. Allston. I sent him a letter last week and have received no favorable answer.
Your loving husband
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. and Mrs. Mattox -

John Howard – John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Moses Fowler – Captain -1st State Troops, Company G, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864, Laurens

Lieut Fan – Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Wm. Gilbert – Private -1st State Troops, Company G, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864, Laurens District

Uncle Adam Steven’s – Uncle Adam - Adam of Miss – Adam Stennis – Adam Turner Stennis was the older brother of Mary A Stennis, the wife of Samuel McKittrick – He was born on September 3, 1819 and died on May 6, 1878. He married Julia Edwards and appears to have removed to Bailey, Mississippi. It also appears from this entry that he controlled the family property in Fairview.

Captain Allston – commander of Company B of the First South Carolina Sharpshooter Battalion

Charleston Barracks Nov. 18th 1863 M.A. McKittrick
Beloved wife
I am quite well this morning. You know that I am no great hand to write to friends when at home But to write to you is my chief joy in camp knowing that it gives you satisfaction by writing and whatever I can do for your pleasure gives me happiness. The reading of your letters and looking at you(r) beautiful likeness must suffice me until I am permitted to enjoy you lovely Presence. I do not remember of ever wanting to see you worse than I do at present, and hope the Lord will allow me to enjoy the precious Privilidge. But I have a very easy time here and my so being so many on Furlough and Detailed that I have not Drilled any for 2 or 3 weeks I am officer of the day about every eighth day and even then the Duty is light. I am never broke of my rest at night and that you know is a great Item with me. We had considerable Excitement here yesterday the Yankees commenced Shelling the city they threw about 22 shells and strange to tell nobody was hurt some unoccupied houses was struck. This is another Demonstration of Divine protection there have in all since the Seige Commenced some 40 shells been thrown into the city and not a man or beast has been killed. The finger of heaven is visible in this I have stronger faith in the security of Charleston than I had before. Although I regard the citty very nearly a Sodom yet I believe there are Setts enough to save it. A Guard was called out to protect the property and I suppose the Engines as it feared the citty would be set on fire But all passed off quietly and last night was the most calm we have had for weeks all is going well now.

Mr. Sprouse who married Mrs. Hopkins daughter called to see me on his way to his co. in regard to renting the old place for his family to live on I am not in favor of letting any person living in the house I have written to uncle Adam to have all the staik land sown and I told Sprouse to write to him and perhaps he might get some and I have written to Rachel in regard to it also. I told Sprouse perhaps I might get home in time to do something for him if we concluded to let him have it. Kiss Jeff for me tell Turner to be a good boy and all the rest to be good children till I com. Nov. 19th 12 o’clock

Dear wife I am very well. I have never had better health I look very well as to health and you would think as to person. This is thanksgiving day here I have just returned from church we are doing nothing today. The yanks are shelling us today again they have thrown several shells into the city. I hear of no person being hurt yet. They did not throw any Shells here yesterday. They almost insecantly shell Sumpter but is thought that their shells strengthen the Fort. There is considerable excitement here But I hope that the strong arm of the Lord will continue to protect us. I visited that portion of the citty that was shelled. One fell in Broad Street within about 70 yards of Gen. Beaurgards Headquarters and tore a large hole in the Street. The Jar of the explosion broke out the windows. I was disappointed this morning in getting a letter from you. I suppose that it got misplaced or J. Bramblet is to Brign it. The time will be out tonight for my other men to return. Send Mrs. Howard her letter. Finally me dear wife do the best you can. I hope to meet you in time and let us prepare to meet each other in Eternity. Your loving husband through time.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Sprouse –

Uncle Adam – Son of John Stennis and Rebecca Peden – Brother of Jane, Rachel, Alexander Peden, Rebecca Eliza and Mary A. Stennis.

Rachel – Older Sister of Mary A. Stennis, and Adam Turner Stennis

J. Bramblett - Josiah Bramlett – Corporal Josiah Bramlett - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mrs. Howard – wife of John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston Nov. 22 1863
Dear wife
I seat myself to inform you that I am by the great mercy of God protected and well. I feel very much discomforted in getting no news form you I ought to have received a letter from you on last Thursday morning and have received none yet. I think shurly you have written one. I look out iously (curiously) every day. The Yankees continued to shell the citty evry day or night they have thrown about 100 shells into or near the citty and strange to say but one Negro woman has been killed yet. The threw 18 shells last night. It is awfully distressing the poor women and children are fleeing for protection I am very fearful they can shell us all out when they the proper range. May the Lord protect us with the citty. There have not fallen nearer than about 350 yards of my quarters. I visited the ground where they had fallen this morning it is awful to behold the destruction they can do.

The inhabitants are moving higher up in the citty from the more unexposed parts. They are still battling away on Fort Sumpter. You are perhaps ready to ask when I can come home I answer I cannot tell you. If I am spared I may come home within about a month. My dear wife if it was left to my choice I would soon see you and my dear little ones but you know I must be subject to my authorities as a good soldier. So I hope you will be patient hoping for the best I long to see you but must wait, till I can see you honorably.

The men who have gone home are very hard to get back. Captain Moses Fowler is very anxious to go home and I suppose form what I learn about his business at home he ought to be at home a while at least. Nov. 23, Monday, I am well this day J.Bramblett arrived this morning I received you letter of the 18th inst. it gave me both joy and pain I am sorry you are unwell if you should get very unwell let me know and I will try and get home. I went to see the General this morning to get J. Howard a furlough he promised to give him one as soon as Lieut. Fan returned. When Howard returns I will try to get a furlough I think you had better do as you see (fit) kill the Bull cows keep the laydots (leather) sell all you don’t keep for all you can get at the factory get thead in part at least or if you can perhaps you had better take it all instead hold on to the hyde till I come home. If Burdet can mop up the cotton get him to gin it perhaps you can get some bargin some how. Do not sell the cotton. If I do not come I will send up some money. I never got your potatoes I will just say to you not to sell Mrs. Fan any more. Things as I find it likely you may never get the money you need not go there with anything to sell she is more blarney than reality of course this is to be kept secret I wrote you in my last about the wheat sowing Eli Baldwin starts home ye night you can see him who can tell you about the shells falling here how many fell in the cittty last night or today so far. I went to church last night if Howard don’t go home I will I am spared send you a letter Saturday God bless you and my dear children, your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Moses Fowler – M Fowler – Moses T. Fowler - M.T. Fowler – Fowler, M. T., 1st Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops Company C (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

J. Bramblett - Josiah Bramlett – Corporal Josiah Bramlett - Private 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Lieut Fan – Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Burdet – In this case Jesse Burdett

Eli Baldwin – Private -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 – Discharged from Company A, Sixteenth South Carolina 1/8/63 as over aged.

Charleston Barracks Dec. 3rd 1863 10 o’clock A.M.
Dear wife
I was anxiously waiting a letter from you this morning until I got rather out of patience and started down to meet the Mail Bearer and to my great joy I met the Mail Bearer with you letter on his way to my Quarters. I am very glad to h ear from you and my dear little ones but sorry to hear your own health is feeble. My dear I hope to see you within 8 or 10 days may the Lord speed the time. I am still enjoying god health and getting on very well. You will have heard before this time by John Howard from me and he can tell you more than I have time to write. I am glad to hear of our communion meeting If I get home the time I expect to I hope to have the pleasure to go with you to that meeting, which would be something like the original days of our acquaintance as it seems to me our union now would be equal to our nuptial bed n some respects better. I am glad you are through sowing wheat. I will say to you to hold on to you sew until I get home at least and as I have written to you before I repeat it again do not sell anything before I get home as I hope to come before long, and then I see about all my business. If this letter should go through straight you will get it on Saturday. If not you will not get it till Wednesday and I will get the one you will start on Tuesday next on Thursday next and then if I go home you need not write to when I am there. I will not make any application until J. Howard returns back to camp and then I hope to get a furlough if he gets home I will get off about next Saturday week or perhaps on Friday night. The Yanks have been shelling for some two or 3 weeks. They have thrown I suppose about 125 or perhaps more and have killed one white and one black woman they have mostly fell harmless among unoccupied houses. It is a wonderful presentation almost a miracle to think that so many misslises have fallen harmlessly in the midst of a crowded citty this demonstrates the Devine Protection in the citty and strange to tell the inhabitants scarcely waked from their slumber or at least a portion of them there have no fallen higher than about 300 or 400 yards I suppose I hear of no damage being done last night.

My dear wife I fear you have received some unjust or cold treatment from some neighbor from whom you expected more sympathy but remember that even our Savior was forsaken and betrayed by his pretended friends. Just let all work their own way and try and not ask them for no more favors than they are willing to grant. Ashmore, I suppose is getting rich will all right if he will deal honestly. Burditt and Teague I fear have forsaken you. Tell Jeffy and Turner that Pa will come if they are good boys. Kiss them all for me and I will kiss you in return. Give my love to Rachel and family and all inquiring friends and to no one else. You loving husband through time.
Samuel McKittrick

J. Howard – John Howard – J.M. Howard, Lieutenant -1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Ashmore – is a neighbor of McKittrick's, the 1860 census lists him as William T. Ashmore aged 55, a farmer living with his wife Nancy.

Burdett – Again this is probably Jesse Burdett

Teague - Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third

Charleston December 5th 1863 Certificates of Sergeant Bosier and Corporal Kirby, Lagrares Point December 4, 1863

I hereby certify to all whom it may concern that on the night of the eleventh of February last being the day that the 3d Regt. of State Troops was disbanded at Pocoltaligo. I was acting corporal of the guard who were stationed there for the purpose of preventing conscripts leaving that on the latter part of that night (the 11th of Feb.) Col. C.I. Elford who was within the Line of my Guard or at least within the bounds of camp Desired to pass the Baggage Waggons through for the purpose loading. I was instructing the Sentitinel to pass the wagons n but not out until further orders. He, Elford, was outside the line and came to me and inquired if I was Corporal of the Guard. I answered yes he then said it would be all be right that he and Lieut. Fraser had the guard placed here. That were stout men here that ought to be in service and that he was as much opposed to them going out of service as I was.

Camp Logans James Island December 4th 1863
I hereby certify to all whom it may concern that on the night of Eleventh of February last being the day of the 3d Regt. of State Troops was Disbanded at Camp Goldsmith, Pocotaligo That I Was Sergeant of the Guard placed there for the purpose of preventing the men of said Regt. from leaving that during the latter part of the night that Col. Elford came to the guard quarters and inquired for the Sergeant, I informed him I was the man he then said he desired to move his Baggage which was in the camp I forbid the passage of the lines, having had order to pass no one over the line. He said it would be all right that he and Lieut. Frazer had placed the guard around the camp, believing his report I supposed the wagons to pass in but not out until morning. He left me I supposed to go to his quarters.
Jacob Bosier – Sergeant

I herby certify that I was corporal when Sergt. Bosier and heard the above converstion between Col. Elford and Sergt. To instruct the senteniel and when I went to the Senteniel I found Elford outside of the lines who came to me while instructing the Senteniel and inquired if I was Corporal of the Guard to which I answered yes he then said it would be all right that he and Lieut Frazer had placed the guard around the camp that there were stout men here that ought to be in service and that he was as much opposed to their going as I was.
Evander Kirby

Jacob Bosier – served in Company B and D - Butler's First and Company A - Twenty-second South Carolina

Evander Kirby – Company D - Manigault's Artillery – Corporal and Company B - First Battalion South Carolina Sharpshooters . He also served as a corporal in Company B - Twenty-Seventh Infantry Regiment.

Col Elford – Commander of 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863

Lieut. Frazer –

Charleston Barracks December 6 1863
Dear wife
I this beautiful Sabbath morning find me by the mercy of God in the enjoyment of good health. I have just come off of Guard as Officer of the Day. I am getting very well. I received your kind and affectionate letter on Thursday morning. I was truly glad to hear from you and that you were getting on as well as you are but sorry to hear that you had been so long and constantly poorly. I want you to bear up as well as well as you can I hope to see you before a great while. I directed you to send conveyance to Greenville for me at the time I expected to be there. But I now think it well be better for me to try and get some other conveyance as it would put you to trouble and ill convenience to send for me and as there is so many uncertainties about me getting there at the appointed time as the cars very often miss connections I intend to try to get at the time I before spoke of. If nothing occurs perhaps I may arrive at your house in Due time if so I know you will cordially receive me I suppose Howard will have started ere you get this. I will not make an attempt until John Howard returns. I visited James Island on last Friday I went to see my old friend Capt. Allston about my Dues and the other men who were with me in the company. I wrote two letters on the subject before but get no satisfaction until I saw him he had no paper to show our discharge they had lost the Judges decree if they ever had got it he got me to write to Newberry for a copy at his expense. I think I will get our money. Allston appeared rather cool toward me and he took exception from a sentence of my letter I very soon stopped him we parted in apparent friendship. The co seemed glad to seem and I got some certificates of Elford’s tratotus (traitorous) conduct from the Sergeant and the Corporal. I also visited J.S. and J.M. Pedin they are well and look very well. John T. Is gone home on furlough when I get to their co. I found Mr. Gilliard preaching to them he told me he would be back in the citty this week. I am going shortly to hear a preacher from Anderson Dist. Who is to preach for our accommodation today.

I hope to be able to go with you to you meeting at Fairview on the 3d Sabbath. I hope the Lord will permit and then I can tell you of many interesting things, near 1o’clock P.M. I have returned from church. We had a good congregation and heard a good sermon. On our way to church we met Gen. Beauregard on his way to a Catholic Church. Pleasant Fowler and Sherfield arrived this morning they say some of the other men up there will soon be down. If I get off when I hope to I will not write to you again if not I will write as I have done. Tell all the dear little ones that maybe I will get home remember me at a Throne of Grace. Your loving husband,
Samuel McKittrick
Mrs. M.A.M.

John Howard – Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Allston – Captain Allston – Captain Joseph Allston – Company B, First S.C. Sharpshooters

Elford – Col Elford – Commander of 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863

J.S. Pedin – J.S. Peden – probably James Scipio Peden who was born in March of 1821 and was killed with the Sixteenth South Carolina, Company I during the Battles around Atlanta. He was married to Elizabeth (Betsy) Mooney Stenhouse, who was born in December of 1828 and died in January of 1912. He is buried at Fairview Presbyterian. He was the father of four children.

J.M Peden – John McVey Peden. John McVey was the oldest child of Scipio Peden and Martha McVey. John McVey Peden was born July 27, 1821 and died June 26, 1891. John M. was in Charleston at this time serving with Company H of the P.B.L.A. Other letters confirm this is the correct J.M. Peden

John T. Peden – Although Mary Stennis’ sister Rebecca Eliza Stennis married John Tillinhast Peden. John Tillinhast is listed as being born in 1822 and having died in 1856. If this is the correct date of death, the only other possibility appears to be John Teasley Peden, the sixth child of John Peden and Elizabeth Ann Baker. He was born in 1810 and died in 1881. He married Margaret Foster in 1836. Two of his sons, James W. and Samuel Reneau, who was born in 1852, are listed as dying in Confederate Service.

Mr. Gillard –

Fairview – Fairview Presbyterian Church, Greenville County, S.C.

General Beauregard – Commander of all forces in defense of Charleston

Pleasant Fowler – Private - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Sherfield - Sheffield, William, Corporal - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston December 10, 1863 Thursday
Mrs. M.A. McKittrick dear wife
I have just received your letter of the 6 and 7 inst. I was fearful from your last letter to hear from this that you would be sick. But I am glad indeed to hear that you are all doing well. I am well and trying to get along as cheerful as I can. But feel considerable disappointed on getting home as soon as I expected to come by reason of Howard’s detention I received a letter from him yesterday. He does not think to be able to come back for several days. I fear there is no chance to get off till Howard returns. And I can make no false excuse to get off as I have not been at home I feel very anxious to see you and our dear little ones. I did fain hope to be with you now within a few days. But I cannot now say when I yet hope to be with you by the 1st of January next I hope that Howard will not act the part of many others stay at home and let me suffer you need not send for me to Greenville as I may not get to Greenville at the time appointed and thereby expose you to unnecessary trouble and disappoint you again I am officer of the day today. This is Thanksgiving or a day of fasting and prayer. George Higgins has been with me a day or this week from John’s Island he is well and doing well. My dear I do not hardly know where to go if I should survive the present service. But I believe that I ought to go to the cavalry as I think it much higher as this is very hard since George is well pleased with his change. I want to do the best I can for myself. If I do not die arange your farm which I fear I will if I off one horse. I am glad to hear of the increase of your Hogs it will pay well to raise hogs at the present. I think if the 9 pigs will all live you may spare one the most runty one at that you must look out for yourself. Kiss Jeffy for me you ever loving and devoted husband.
Samuel McKittrick

George Higgins – G.P. or George P. Higgins served in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina and also in Company A of the Sixth South Carolina

John’s Island – located between Edisto and James Island on the S.C. coast, near Charleston.

Charleston Barracks December 23 1863
Dear wife
I have just a few minits ago received your favor of 1st and hasten to reply. I am well and trying to do the best I can and truly glad to hear from you and the dear babes and that Addy is nearly through her book I think I would doubtless have been at home with you before this time if John Howard had have come back. And I am led to believe he could have been here. If he had have been willing to make the effort. There are so many officers absent I fear there will be no chance for a few days. The Col. thinks there will be a chance about the first of January. I intend to come home if Howard is well enough to come and does not come I can not be there he ever come or not if he does not come in time for me to go home. But for me he would never have got off when he did.

I believe I will want your horse for service take good care of him so he will improve. You want to know what to do about hiring Ala. But perhaps it would be best if I say to you if you think so do as you think best if she can do good work but then there will be expense attached to it you will have to board old Sampson good part of the time the clothing and time she will be sick and C. All added to the $60 dollars will make considerable expense. But it seems that you may make her pay if she can weave and spindle be sure to know whether she cand do this. I can get no cards here for less than $50 awful high I hopet to get home within a few days. I am invited to take a fine dinner on Christmas day. Col. Roberts and my Lieut. Are also invited it will be a German Feast I have very cordially accepted the invitation. A Happy Christmas to you my loving wife.
Samuel McKittrick

Addy – Adaline – McKittrick’s daughter

Col. –

Howard – Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Ala. –

Sampson –

Charleston Barracks, December Mrs. M.A. McKittrick
Dear and beloved wife
I am well this morning as t o body but dissatisfied in mind form the fact I once thought that I would be with you this day but I find myself unusually mistaken. My furlough was disapproved while other very near or quite the same in nature was approved. I have no hope of getting home while Howard stays in Greenville and that he appears determined to do though he may be unable to come. It mortifies me to think that I cannot get home for his neglect or want of proper principle. I intend to make another effort if Howard comes and if not I do not know when I will hope to come about the first of February. I want you in your next letter to let me know how my Bill horse is getting on and whether you can spare him from you farm or not I have concluded to go into the cavalry service. My dear wife I know you desire me to into the most easy service. I think that several of our Regt. will go into that service. I learned by Mrs. Farr’s letter to her husband that you were at Farrs on last Tuesday. She stated that you were looking well but getting quite large. My dear why did you keep that matter from your husband I guessed there were something wrong with you all right I am as much to blame as you and perhaps more. I long to see you hope to see you on someday.

Mr. Gilliard is here again preaching for us. The Yanks have not shelled us much for the last week I think they are beginning to find it to be a hard job to take the citty. Brother James was with me last Thursday night he is looking well. I hope you are enjoying yourself well today perhaps at church my prayers are with you and for you. You must do the best you can with your business perhaps you had better kill your hogs as I do not know when I can come. Your loving husband.
Samuel Mckittrick

Howard – Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mrs. Farr – wife of Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant-1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Gilliard –

Brother James -

Charleston January 3, 1864
Dear wife
I seat myself a few minits to converse with you I am by the mercy of God in good health my dear it appears utterly impossible for me to get a Furlough I have tried faithfully and different all to no effect my last application came back last night Disapproved. The time has so nearly past I think there will be but little more furloughs granted. My dear I fear I shall not be able to see you before my time is out I hope they cannot hold me when my time is out. I want to see you about the worst I ever have. I received your letter of 29 December I know you feel much disappointed about me not getting home but dear be of good cheer I hope it will all work well I am disappointed about many things in relation to my business and c. You want to know what to do about shoeing Bill if he needs it shoe him all round I am sorry I cannot see him I fear he will not do for cavalry he being so young and that you cannot do without him get the advice of some friend if I have any up there and let m e know what they think and how Bill looks & C. I am at a loss to know where to go whether to the 16th Regt. or to the cavalry or to the artillery. I must go some where unless they change the law I will get 30 days after my time is out here. Before I am compelled to go into service I send Mr. Ashmore a few lines in relation to his brothers interest please show it to him. If he can get a copy of the Judges Decree in our cases I am pretty sure of getting our money for our services but for the careless or news of Capt. Allston we would have had our money before this time. The Yankees have not shelled us since last Thursday. The weather is very cold here now. I suppose not near as you have. I am Officer of the day today. Instead of going home I hope John and Jeffy are better as you informed me they were unwell in your last. My dear try to do the best you can in everything I cannot see what is the matter with some of your neighbors but perhaps they think they have reasons for so doing. I have no perfect in any person living but my wife and will say you need not trust any person I am satisfied I would have been home long ago if Howard had acted as I think he migh although I may be mistaken. I believe he could have bee here sometime ago if he had been willing. Your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Bill – McKittrick’s horse

16th Regt. – Sixteenth South Carolina

Mr. Ashmore – brother of James Ashmore – who shares join concerns about service in the First Battalion S.C. Sharpshooters

Allston – Captain Allston – Captain Joseph Allston – Company B, First S.C. Sharpshooters

Howard - Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Dalton, Georgia Jan. 9, 1864
Dear Sister
Having remained silent so long I cant make an excuse that would justify the neglect that I feel I have been guilty of so I have determined to promise to do better in the future and make no apology for the past. First then you will see that I am yet in the Army and in the same Regiment that I started out with in the summer of 1861. After the Evacuation of Corinth, Miss., 63 I returned from the Army on account of bad health, my health being pretty much restored I joined my command again on the 30th of October last and have been with the Regt. since at present we are having a cold time of it, still the health of the Army is good, and the rations pretty short and of a poor quality especially as far as that is concerned for we have nothing yet but Beef and that of the poorest quality. One of my near neighbors A.W. Ped who had been home on furlough, got back to camp 5 days ago and brought me some bacon and sausages from home which was very acceptable. I also received news by him that my wife had been delivered of a fine large boy on the 21st of December and was doing pretty well. All the friends in Kemper were well when he let except Margaret Mooney, she was though her health was as good as usual to all appearances.


Tell Rachel I would like to hear from her. The last that I heard from her, she had started to the Army to see her son John who was wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga. I heard she met him at Columbia, S.C. on his way home. I have not heard how badly he was wounded and am anxious to hear.

Give my respects to all the friends and accept my best wishes for your prosperity and happiness.

Your Brother
A.T. Stennis

Jan. 29 Dear Husband

We are well this morning and as I forgot to send it today and a line or two in it I got our salt home yesterday, Tuesday night, it cost me $9.90 cts. I sent our fodder yesterday Ak and Nat is very anxious to see the beads you have for them they tell Turner you have a fine top for him. I herd last night you would get to Greenville Tuesday night I hope it is so as your loving wife till death
M.A. McKittrick

A.W. Ped – A.W. Peden – Probably Andrew White Peden Married Margaret Knox – House of Thomas, page 186, The Peden’s of North America

The child is Joseph Dudley Stennis born December 21, 1863. He would die on April 22, 1934 and have three children following his marriage to Peral Mahan in 1897

Margaret Mooney – there is a Margaret Mooney who was the granddaughter of Moses White Peden. Since she is the child of his third child, Rebecca Elvira Peden, who married Silas M. Mooney who was killed in the war, it is possible she is the person in question. She married Henry Arrington and had four children but no dates of birth or death are available.

Rachael - Rachel Stennis Anderson – sister of Adam Turner Stennis and Mary Stennis McKittrick

John Stennis Anderson – Born April 2, 1842 and Died July 21, 1866. Died without having married. Served in the Third Battalion or Laurens Battalion, Company C as a Sergeant. Wounded at Chickamauga serving with Kershaw’s Brigade.

Adam Stennis and the Fifth Mississippi Infantry

Company I, Fifth Mississippi Infantry

Fifth Mississippi Infantry - History

Adam Stennis served in Company I of the Fifth Mississippi Infantry Regiment. The unit was organized in 1861 and consolidated with the Third Mississippi Battalion from July of 1864 to April of 1865. At the end of the war in North Carolina the unit was consolidated with several other Mississippi Infantry Regiments. (Sifakis) The unit served in numerous departments and the Army of Mississippi primarily in Withers’ Division. In November of 1863 it moved with Withers’ Division to the Army of Tennessee and in December of 1863 joined Jackson’s Brigade of Cheatham’s Division. From February to July it was a moved to Walker’s Division and in July, during the Atlanta Battles the unit briefly served with the Gist Brigade. It then moved to Lowrey’s Brigade and served in Cheatham’s Corp until the end of the war.

The unit saw action in the following battles:

Shiloh
Murfreesboro
Chickamauga
Missionary Ridge
Atlanta
Franklin
Nashville
The Carolinas
Bentonville

Albert E. Fant and John R. Dickens served as the Colonel’s who commanded the regiment. Samuel F.M. Faucett, John B. Herring, W.L. Sykes served as Lieutenant Colonel, with Herring also serving in the rank of Major. James R. Moore, John Weir and Adam T. Stennis also served as Majors of the unit. John Weir served as Colonel as well. Stennis also served as Adjutant in the unit. The fifth was organized with men from Pike, Amite, Lauderdale, Winston, Noxubee, and Kemper Counties. It served in Florida very early in the war and fought at Shiloh under General Chalmers. The unit lost 47% of the 170 engaged at Murfreesboro and 33% of the men engaged at Chickamauga Only a remnant surrendered in April of 1865. (Crute)

Also serving in Company I of the Fifth we find the following:

Peden, Andrew H.
Peden, A.W. – mentioned above
Peden, D.A. – shown as a Second Lieutenant of Company I, Fifth Mississippi State Troops
Peden, David T.
Peden, James D. – Second Lieutenant
Peden, James K.
Peden, John J. – Sergeant
Peden, John T. – Ord. Sgt.
Peden, J.R. – Sergeant – listed as Company I, Fifth Mississippi State Troops
Peden, Lacy G.
Peden, M.W.
Peden, Robert M. - First Lieutenant
Peden, T.J. – listed as Company I, Fifth Mississippi State Troops

Charleston January 10th 1864
Dear wife
I am well this morning by the mercy of God ------------------- the weather is very cold here and I have no news of interest I am trying to get alone as well as I can here nlw out (now our) time is growing short. I will not be able to see you before our time is out here now. Howard got safely here Thursday night I received you treat of good things made think of you and home this morning when I sit down to the Table But oh I am denied this pleasure I cannot get a /Furlough upon honorable grounds being an officer. I not been an officer I could have got a Furlough as a wheat sower. I am trying to be satisfied as well as I can. Col. Roberts was tried last Thursday I think he will be cashiered. He is doing very badl he is drunk almost every day. I consider him a ruined man much better if he had never been Col. of this Regt. than to have fallen down as he has. But has nobody to blame but himself he was advised different. I heard through Mrs. Farr that John and one of the girls was at Greenville last Thursday and that you were all well. I am truly glad to hear from you tell Mr. Ashmore that I have received the papers I wrote him about from McDaniels and at Greenville. What troubles me now mostly is to know where to go when I am out here. I have concluded to go to Columbia tonight to see what can be done there perhaps I can get in there if not I have rather concluded to to (go to) Sulavans Cavalry in Aiken’s Regt. I am fearful that Bill will not do I want to hear your report about him the Lieut. Col. can give leave of absence for 24 hours I will go tonight and stay in Columbia tomorrow and return tomorrow night. The conscripts are very anxious at the expiration of the present term. I hope you are able to go on with business in your poorly situation. My dear wife on my mind as a good soldier I must live as long as I can in you absence. I hope my little ones are all doing well. I bought --------- per John. Kiss them all for me.
Samuel McKittrick

Howard – Howard, J. M., 2nd Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Col. Roberts – Thomas B. Roberts - First (1st) Regiment, South Carolina State Troops, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Mention of the arrest of Colonel T.B. Roberts, Bradley Family Papers, University of South Carolina

Mrs. Farr – wife of Farr, W. R. B., 1st Lieutenant - 1st State Troops, Company K, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

John and one of the girls – his son and one of his daughters

Mr. Ashmore –

McDaniels –

Sulavans Cavalry in Aiken’s Regt. – Company A of the Sixth S.C. Cavalry – Commanded respectively by Captain M.A. Sullivan and Col. Hugh Aiken.

Bill – Mckittrick’s Horse

Lieut. Col. - W. Ludlow Hodges - First (1st) Regiment, South Carolina State Troops, Aug 1863 - Feb 1864

Charleston January 13 1864
Mrs. M.A. McKittrick
Dear wife
I seat myself to converse a few moments with you. I am my dear well this morning. I went to Columbia on last Sunday night and back Monday night I was tempted very much to go home. I thought of going when I left and was advised to go by others But as bad as I want to see you and my dear little ones I could not go although the Lieut. Col. Hodges intended me to go. But as I had not got to go sooner I could not go in that way I intend to try to go through this was (way) on through my life honestly. I hope you will be contented with my course. Knowing my position here, I did not succeed in getting into the company at Columbia. I am troubled to know where to go after my time is out here but I rather thing I will go to Capt. Sulivan’s co. I earnestly hope that I will be allowed to go home a few days. It is all I can do th (to) bear up with y abscense from you. You are scarcely ever out of my mind. Your lovely form and graceful manners continually haunt me. There is nothing in this world that can remove my affections for you save that which I know will never happen, a want of reciprocal love. The Yankees have (been) shelling the citty rapidly since yesterday evening. I heard of but one man being hurt he is wounded in the hand by a fragment of shell he is not one of our Regt. I took dinner with Cousin Thomas Stennis last Monday his and Eben’s families are both in good health Except Mrs. Barker who appears to be declining in health. Tomorrow is my day to get a letter from you. I hope to hear good news from you. I hope you are able to get on with business. Remember my dear you have full control in my absence to carry on things as you think best. We have had very cold weather here and a great deal of rain is still raining. My dear wife I try to serve the Lord but I fear that I am too ---------- about home to do my duty. Perhaps no give my respects to all enquiring friends & C. As ever you loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Lt. Col. Hodges – W. Lud Hodges, Lieutenant Colonel - First (1st) Regiment South Carolina State Troops - Aug 1863 - Feb 1864 – Also served as a Lt. In Company I of the Sixteenth

The Company at Columbia – probably Hamilton’s Provost Guard

Sulivan’s co – Company A, Sixth S.C. Cavalry

Thomas Stennis – should be Stenhouse

Eben Stennis – should be Stenhouse - The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

Mrs. Barker – See entry above – Agnes Barkley

Charleston January 26th, 1864
Mrs. Mary McKittrick
Dear wife

I seat myself this evening to let you know that I am well truly hoping that you and my little ones are enjoying the same blessing. The Yankees have run us from our good quarters. They have been throwing shells all around us for several days. We were ordered to move to safer quarters. We packed up and moved about a half a mile. We are not as well quartered now as before but I cannot complain. The 8 companies from Greenville are all in and around one large house. The men are too much crowded but it is better than tent. I visited James Island yesterday and Capt. Allston’s company I found no commissioned officer present. I left the papers I received from Greenville with him or with the Sergeant and Major. I received you letter dated Tuesday. I am sorry for myself and for you that I did not get home but I yet hope to see you soon. I took dinner with Brother James yesterday he is well and doing well the weather is cold here today I am glad to hear you are doing so well as I think you are the Yankees are still shelling the citty they appear determined to shell us out. I am glad to hear that Bill is doing well I think I will need him for service. If I do not get into some service here. There is considerable excitement here now. My dear wife I cannot tell you my anxiety to see you. You are always uppermost in my mind when awake and last night when asleep. But alas when I awoke I found it all a dream. But I fondly hope that my dreams will all be realized in the full fruition of one of the best wives in the Confederacy. I have bought 72 bushels of salt it is now at Greenville I suppose. I can to buy some more for your use. I got a good Barrel which will make you 2 fine tubs. I suppose thta some 3 bushels will do you you you can sell the other to whom you please do not take less that $22 per Bushel 50 pounds to the bushel perhaps you can sell for 25 dollars or more do the best you can with it you do not know what it cost. You must get some person to attend to it and pay the freight and get it home to you inform me what can be done if you can sell it readily I can send you more but if not

End of Letter

8 companies from Greenville – there are only two Greenvlle companies in Robert's Regiment

Captain Allston’s Company - Company B, First South Carolina Sharpshooter Battalion

James Island – The island overlooking Charleston Harbor to the Southeast, most of the fighting for Charleston took place on this and the adjoining islands.

Brother James –

Bill – the McKittrick horse

Charlesotn January 23, 1864
Dear wife
I am well this morning and doing the best I can I have been so pressed this week that I failed last Wednesday my usual day to write you. I was compelled to visit Sullivan’s Island on my own Special Business if you know its nature I think you would very readily excuse me besides I assure you I desired to write to you and for about the 1st time lately if ever failed to write you twice a week. We have pleasant weather now. I received your letter you spoke of from Howard. I also received on yesterday yours of last Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. I was glad to hear that you are doing as well as you are although it is vexing to hear of Lins conduct. If I should get home I will try and exchange her off. I am about making an agreement to think of getting home at the end of our service which will end the last on this month. I think I will be allowed to go home and forever I hope that Addy is getting better by this time. I have bought her and Matty a Strand of Beeds apiece and John and Turner a Top I also got a book and will get Addy and Matty some too if I can they are very scarce here now. Sunday 24 1864 Dear wife I am well this morning we have (hear) considerable about landing our Regt Col. McCullough of the 16th Regt. arrived this morning on recruiting service. He was in my quarters this morning and the Rev. Giliard took Breakfast with me this morning and just finished service in our quarters. He is one that sticks to his text in the war. I hope that I will get home within some ten days. We are not yet certain when our Regt. will be disbanded some think probably not until the 12th of March 3 months from leaving home. We will sonn know I perhaps wrote too soon about our salt although it maybe in Greenville soon if not now look out for it and C. I do not yet know where I will get to serve I hope to get home before I choose my co. My dear do the best you can your loving husband till death
Samuel Mckittrick

Sullivan’s Island – Island just north of Charleston overlooking Charleston Harbor – Home of Fort Moultrie

Howard – Lt. J.M. Howard

Lin – Servant within the McKittrick Household

Addy – Matty – John – Turner – McKittrick children

Col. McCullough – Commander of the Sixteenth Regiment

Rev. Giliard

Charleston January 27th 1864
Dear wufe
I drop you a few lines (to) inform you I am here and getting on as usual. I am still blessed with good health. I have no news of special interest to give you. We are anxiously waiting out discharge from Service so I can once more meet my lovely wife and children who are no doubt as anxious as I am to see their Husband and Father. I suppose that I will be allowed the opportunity of going home before I select my co even if the privates are not permitted to go which I fear will be the case. I am fearful that U will not be allowed to go to Sullivan’s Cavalry as his co was made since 1862. I believe I can do as well or perhaps better to go to the old 16th. Col. McCullough is very anxious for me to go to his Regt. he offers very fair he proposes to do something for me he says he needs such men as me. My co are all or nearly all going with him. We are not certain that we will be disbanded before the 12th of March as there is difference of opinion whether it expires on the 1st of February or on the 12th of March. I am satisfied either way it is service anyway. If we are held till March I will com home on Furlough. I have sent to Columbia and purchased a pair of cards for you. We sent up an agent and bought some 45 pair for $20 per pair you no doubt will be glad to hear this news Gen Beauregard has been absent for sometime and is expected to or has returned so I think we will soon know what will become of us. Col. McCullough can not recruit until the Gen. Allows him so to do. Pork is selling for $12.00 per pound Flour 50 cts per pound sweet potatoes 10 to 12 dollars corn meal 1.50 per bushel molasses $16.00 per gallon Sugar 4.00 per pound and everything else is proportion. What are we to come to starvation is looking many in the face now here in the city what will it be if the war last long. My dear wife kiss the little ones for me hopin I will kiss you shortly in return. Your loving husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Sullivan’s Cavalry – see earlier entry concerning joining the cavalry

Old 16th – 16th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers

Col. McCullough – commander of the Sixteenth at the time

Gen. Beauregard – commander of all forces in defense of Charleston

cards – a tool used to “draw” fiber before it is spun.



To Return to the Letters Index, follow General Gist; to go home, follow the flag.