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Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.
Letters of Samuel McKittrick
Parts I and II
Sixteenth
South Carolina
C.S.A.


"Brass Mounted Army"
Music by Dayle K.

McKittrick Letters Part II and III

McKittrick Letters Part V



Our thanks to the Director of the Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield Park and Willie Johnson, Historian at Kennesaw Mountain.

Samuel McKittrick wrote the following letters to his wife in the Fairview Community of lower Greenville County. The Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield Park preserves them in typewritten form, my thanks to Willie Johnson, Historian at the Park, and to the Director of the Park for their assistance with the preservation and presentation of these letters. My thanks also to Russell Brown for his wonderful book on "the other General Walker" , To the Manor Born, General W.H.T. Walker and to Susan Finley.

These letters appear in five clusters. The first cluster dates from the initial formation of the 16th South Carolina, when McKittrick attempted to raise a company that joined the 16th and became a part of “I” Company of the Sixteenth. McKittrick is referred to as Captain during this time. McKittrick’s attitude toward enlistment for the war and his willingness to leave the unit I find very revealing.

The second cluster is perhaps the most interesting, these letters are written during McKittrick's service with Elford's Third South Carolina State Reserves. McKittrick serves in Captain Thomas B. Roberts, Company B as a Sergeant. This unit was in service from June of 1862 to January of 1863, under Elford's Third S.C. Reserves. These letters provide explanation about some of the political issues that cloud Elford's Third S.C. Reserve and some insight into how so many men of the Sixteenth came to serve in that unit and other reserve units and then later to find themselves returned to the Sixteenth. When considered in light of Colonel Elford’s Letter to the Public we get a good look at how many of the men of this unit felt about conscription and enlistment. Many of the officers and men of the Sixteenth follow Captain McKittrick's example and literally follow him. John Howard is one who follows McKittrick very closely.

The third group covers McKittrick's less than voluntary service in Company B, First South Carolina Sharpshooters. McKittrick's on going relationship with Captain Allston reveals a great deal about the up country - low country rivalry that dominated so many issues in South Carolina's history. We also get some insight into the movements of units in coastal service.

The fourth group follows McKittrick's service as a Captain in Company K of the First State Troops or Reserves from August of 1863 to February of 1864. This unit served under the command of Colonel T.B. Roberts. You will recall that Roberts was earlier McKittrick's Captain. Roberts, John Howard, and other well known friends return to the stage for this act. As it becomes clear that the south is hard pressed, we see these greater issues unfold in such small choices as infantry versus cavalry service. One cannot help but think that Samuel McKittrick would have been better off to have taken Bill and joined the cavalry.

The final cluster of letters are when McKittrick returns to service in the Sixteenth during the battles around Atlanta. McKittrick will enter as a private with a promise of promotion to the rank of lieutenant. He will rise to the rank of Captain of Company I or at least serve in that capacity.

The common thread in these letters is the reluctance of many of the Greenville men in the Sixteenth to enlist for the war and the methods they use to avoid service outside of the state of South Carolina. The letters provide many answers about why the Sixteenth was a unit of old men and young boys. The Sixteenth was formed after the initial influx of volunteers into units like the Butler Guard and the other early companies from Greenville that joined units like the Hampton Legion and the Fourth South Carolina. These men, that is those like McKittrick, are truly reluctant rebels. However, when called, they will serve well, and many like Captain, or Lieutenant McKittrick, will give their all in the terrible late war battles of the Gist Brigade.

A note of thanks to the staff at Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield, Bil Brasington, for his pioneer work on S.C. Reserve units and Susan Finlay who is always ready to transcribe or proof, both of which I need.

One of the real problems with these letters is that the individual who transcribed them does not seem to know the names of the men or the units involved. (These are obscure units serving in a backwater theatre. Unless you happen to die there or your service was there, public interest was and is very small, so please understand that I am not being critical. It would be hard for anyone to know about these units until very recently, much less understand them.) Also there is a tendency of either McKittrick or the person typing the letters to leave out words and scramble phrases, something we all do under pressure, and either is possible. Later in the letters some of the names are particularly difficult to discern and some become very clear. I have done the best I can to identify individuals when I can. Please let me know if you have other thoughts or ideas.

Samuel McKittrick
Buried: Fairview Presbyterian Church, Fountain Inn, S.C.

Married: Mary A. Stennis, 1845
Born: June 8, 1824
Died: June 11, 1900
Listed: The Peden's of North America, page 440
The House of Alexander Peden
Eight Children are recorded, five survived to become adults.

John Alexander McKittrick
Born: October 13, 1854
Died: August 2, 1918
John in the following letters - The young man who assumes responsibility for the family in the absence of his father. John was ten in 1864. John would marry Francis (Mollie) Sprouse in 1883. They would have seven children.

Adaline McKittrick (Addie)
Born: May 18, 1855
Died: June 21, 1929
Adaline in the following letters, Adaline was nine in 1864. She would marry John Simpson in 1894. She had no children.

Martha McKittrick (Mattie)
Born: April 25, 1857
Died: May 7, 1924
Martha in the following letters, Martha is seven in 1864. Martha would marry Warren H. Sprouse in 1881. She would have four children.

Samuel Turner McKittrick
Born: February 22, 1859
Died: September 25, 1898
Turner was five in 1864. Turner would marry Temperance (Tempie) West Scott in 1890. They would have five children.

Jefferson Davis McKittrick
Born: December 27, 1861
Died: November 28, 1932
Jeffy was three in 1864. He would marry twice, first to Nannie Thackston in 1895 and then to Catherine (Kitty) Young. His only child would die as an infant.

In the 1860 census, Samuel McKittrick is listed as a school teacher 35 years of age. The issue of his age will become a major question as we will see. His wife Mary is listed as a domestic aged 34. John A. (John) is listed as six, Adaline (Addie) is listed as five, Martha (Mattie) as three, and Samuel T. (Turner), as one. Jeffy or Jefferson Davis is still to be born. Samuel McKittrick holds a fair amount of property, in excess of of seven thousand dollars worth. He is also shown as owning two slaves, one 22, and one 19, both listed as black females. One of these is probably Rose who wishes to marry later in the letters and the other is probably Lin.



Part One
Captain Samuel McKittrick
Company I
Sixteenth South Carolina Infantry

Camp Goldsmith Pocataligo January 4, 186?

Dear Wife

Having finished my necessary labor I set myself down on the pleasant Sabbath morning to let you how I am getting along on. I am permitted by the mercy of God to enjoy good health. I have been well ever since I left home. My messmates are all well also. Thomas Goldsmith is sick with pneumonia is better this morning than he has been I hope he is not dangerously bad. I started a letter to you on this day week(and sent) by. Mr. Jackson and Rice also I hope you have received both of them before now on that day. I heard a sermon from our Chaplain, at night we had a prayer meeting as we have almost every night, there is I think many zealous and devoted Christians among us every night our camp is ringing with Hymns of praise to God. They assemble in groups to sing and pray there is good attention given to the exercises proving clearly that he that feareth God and walk (in) righteousness will be accepted of him although differently situated in life. Mr. Baine is absent from camp at present.

I hope that this cruel and unholy war will soon terminate and we will all be allowed to dwell at home in peace and quietude. I often think of the hardships you have to have in struggling along with our helpless family I hope ther will be a change ere long We have great reason to be thankful to our heavenly Father for his many favors in preserving our lives and permitting us to enjoy the blessings and supporting each other amidst the trials of life. I need not now as, I have often told you that your lovely form is seldom out of my vision, to enjoy your smiles is more than ordinary pleasure. But I am denied this for the present. I try to remember you at a throne of grace, and, I think I am receiving the same favor in return. I only wish I could be free from the temptations of the world. I have been called on to lead in prayer in our night meetings I respond to the call as well as I can and although in weakness I always feel I like I am in discharge of duty. I have had some pleasant moments in this way. My dear wife be sure to write regularly to your loving husband.

Samuel McKittrick

Thanks to Russell Brown, January 4, 1863, is a Sunday so this letter is out of order. However, it is a good introduction and I shall leave it as is.

Camp Goldsmith - Named for Captain Wm. Goldsmith. Captain Goldsmith served on the staff of the Sixteenth early in the war. The Goldsmith family was an old South Carolina family, they were patriots of the highest order with deep lineage that stretched to the Revolution. The two William Goldsmiths were closely related to the two Thomas Goldsmiths listed below, see Officers of the Sixteenth for additional information. McKittrick confirms that the camp is named for Wm. Goldsmith in a later letter. Camp Goldsmith was the location of the camp of the Third Reserves in 1863 and was located at Pocataligo, see the Benson letters, letter from Sgt. P.B. Benson attached to letter from Lt. R.T. Benson. P.B. Benson served as a Corporal in Company F of Elford's Third State Troops from June of 1862 until January of 1863. Benson also served as a Sergeant in Company H of the First State Troops from August of 1863 to February of 1864. R.T. Benson was a Lieutenant in Company G of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Pocataligo - a point on the Charleston Savannah Railroad that was often threatened by Union Forces staging out of Beaufort, South Carolina.

Thomas Goldsmith – Thomas Goldsmith the older – Lieutenant, Sixteenth South Carolina, Company I – First Sergeant, Company B, Elford’s Third South Carolina Reserves. Thomas Goldsmith the younger served as a Private in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Mr. Jackson – There is one Jackson, A.W. that appears in the Company G of the Third South Carolina Reserves under Colonel Elford. Company G was from another section of Greenville County

Mr. Rice – Probably L.C. Rice of Company C, Elford's Third South Carolina Reserves, Company C is from the same area of the county as Company B.

Mr. Baine – Corporal Wm. Bayne served in Company B of the Elford’s Third South Carolina Reserves with McKittrick.

Chaplain - T.R. Gaines is Chaplain of Elford's Third South Carolina Reserves and is mentioned often in these letters. He is listed as such in Broadfoot. There is also a T.P. Gaines listed in Broadfoot as serving with Company A of the Palmetto Light Artillery Battalion and a T.P. Gaines mentioned in the list of Furman Graduates. The Furman graduate is listed in Company A of the P.B.L.A. and is listed as dying in service. Broken Fortunes does not reflect this death.



Camp Hampton near Columbia January 26, 1862

Dear Wife

I now seat myself to let you know that I am well and have been same ever since I left home we got to camp on Friday night about dusk about 15 companies in camp we struck up camp that night on the next morning each man drew his rations.

Every man drew a knife and fork, a tin plate and cup every mess a coffee and Beef kettle. The boys (drew) beef flour and molasses have lived well since we left home, all seem in fine spirits. Tell Mr. Burdettes folks that William is doing very well and seems well satisfied. I went to Columbia on yesterday I called a few minutes on Mr. Stenhouse, I found them all well with exception of measles I found Mrs. Stenhouse a very fine lady, a(nd) much in favor of (the)Volunteers. I was impressed with the contrast, I had not been at Columbia for some 11 or 12 years, when, I found myself in soldiers uniform. Tell cousin Hyness that her brother Eben is getting better he has been very bad. We have agreed to go into the Greenville Regt. I am going down on the night train to Charleston to see how things are going on I expected to visit the Regiment, my company is not full. I cannot therefore go into the Regt, formed here. The government promises to give me time to recruit up he says it is to large a company to disband if it is impossible to help I went and saw him [Chestnut] on yesterday and he sent for me this morning. Tell Mr. Johnson I have not got him off. Send him now forthwith as he can fit for coming down. I hope to be able to comp up this week to fix up things and recruit my company. Tell everybody that will come that we are getting on finely. Dear wife, I refrain from indulging in thoughts about home and all that I love dearly to such a degree as to give me the blues in camp. I would like to see all my dear ones and little, Jeff Davis, Tell John Adaline, Martha and Turner to be good children. We have a very peaceable time in camp. There is no drilling today there will be dress parade this evening at the usual time, I suppose, Dear wife do the best you can I am trying to do that (the same) thing. But oh how different is camp to home life. I have formed many acquaintances since I left home. Dear wife trust in God who can help to the utmost, I try to place my hope in him. I must soon start the cars run within 300,00 (300) yards and camp. I will get on her at about dark and will arrive at Charleston before day, Farewell, Dear wife,

S. McKittrick

Camp Hampton – located outside of Columbia South Carolina was an initial staging area for troops from the upper part of the state. It is thought by many that the camp was located near where the State Archives are located today (2001).

William Burdett – is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as B. Wm. Burdett he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina. He is listed as sixteen in the 1860 census and is the older brother of David Wilcott Burdett, who will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves.

Mr. and Mrs. Stenhouse – Samuel McKittrick had married Mary A. Stennis in 1845. The Stennis and the Stenhouse families were both a part of the powerful group of families that controlled politics and culture in lower Greenville County. Almost certainly, the family mentioned is an extension of the Fairview Community living in Columbia at the time of this letter. See Eben Stenhouse listed below for more information.

Cousin Hyness – this maybe an error in transcription but she is or was the sister of Eben Stenhouse.

Cousin Hyness’ brother Eben – Eben Stenhouse, who is mentioned often in these letters. The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

Greenville Regiment – the 16th South Carolina, S.C.V. - The unit is known as the Greenville Regiment at this early stage of the war.

Chesnutt or Chesnut– the name appears in brackets in the letter. This is Colonel, later General, James Chesnut Jr. At this stage of the war he is serving on the South Carolina Executive Council. He will resign this position to serve on the staff of President Davis in the year 1862. A graduate of Princeton, he served in the United States Senate and was a member of the Secession Convention. He also served in the Provisional Confederate Congress and was the husband of Mary Chesnut.

Mr. Johnson – J.P. Johnson served as a Sergeant in Company I of the Sixteenth. J.W. Johnson served as a Corporal with the Sixteenth and maybe the same as W.J. that served with Elford’s Third. The J.W. with the Sixteenth is listed with 16th/24th Consolidated, which was formed just prior to the surrender. W.H. and W.J. Johnson both served in Company C of Elford’s Third South Carolina Reserves, a unit also drawn from the lower end of Greenville County.

Jeff Davis, John, Adaline, Martha, and Turner – Captain McKittrick’s children, Jeff Davis is often referred to as Jeffy.

Cars – archaic expression that refers to the railroad cars – getting on the cars – getting on the train.

Columbia, S.C. Feb. 17, 1862

Dear Wife,

I find myself well this morning I arrived safely I found (?) Burdett with measles he was broken out the doctor pronounced his case a light one. On last Saturday morning he (was) sent (to) the doctor and made application to go to the hospital the doctor said there would be more danger in moving than for him to stay in camp. So he was put in an affected (This word affected maybe hooded) tent and is still there. David Taylor, Andrew Allsion G.M. White and Wilburn Cury are all poorly. I am now at the Hospital. Lt. McCrary is here with measles but is doing very well he is mending so he can go home in a few days I found all the rest of hte boys doing well I am going to get Wm. Burdettee here as soon as he can be moved I think he get on very well though now he is pretty sick. Lt. McCrary gives a good account of the treatment at the hospital. As soon they get better they can go home I want you to let Mr. Burdett’s people see this letter though I may write one to them soon. When I came home I found a letter from Col. Elford stating that if he could get up our list to 55 men he would make on the roll and also get a letter from Cap. I. Shumate proposing for me try and get those men in Laurens Dist. The 28 men spoken of in his newer Regt. Of Laurens are not returned. General Gist has written to the Col. of that Regt., this is not Moseleys Regt. from what I can find out that Regt. has finished its quota or at least they cannot be got at. I went this morning to Col. Chestnutt I told him the condition of the company and showed him Elfords letter he directed the letter and the situation of the company to sent to General Gist at Charleston. So within a day or two we will know what is to be done. I now think the chance pretty fair for a company. The boys are anxious still Col. Chestnutt told me there would be a call for five regiments for the war the call he said would be made within about 2 weeks. So all hands may pitch in this in no joke I had it from Chestnutt himself and others also. I think this will help my company. We are getting plenty to eat we are informed that we get pay for the time we left home so the boys are in better spirits than when I left for home.

You tell those fellows who think there will be no more calls they (need to) fix up and come on . I understand that there is a correspondence going on between the Confederate War Department and the counsel of this state (that) the call will come from the Confederate authority. I find there are soldiers coming home to stay. I am told that if they do not volunteer they may be drafted. I am very fearful the draft will come well let it come on. I am out of it and intend to stay out. Dear wife, I need not tell you about what to do I know you do the very best you can. I find a firm reliance in the Divine protection the greatest consolation when absent from dear ones of any other support I can get. I hope to continue that trust. I find many things to disgust and sicken the eye and ear there are some prominent vices in camp that are hard to suppress but I hope the Grace of God will support me in every temptation. I feel that I am not what I ought to be but I thank God that I am kept from some vices that many indulge in. Dear wife there is one thing I desire you to do that is train our dear children in the primary principles of their duty to God. The thought (of) leaving them exposed to the many snares give some pain but the consolation of knowing they have a pious mother refutes that sorrow. Tell John, Adaline, and Martha not to neglect their prayers. Dear wife, remember you absent husband in your prayers write soon and often, farewell at present,

Saml. McKittrick

To John Adaline and Martha dear children I am now about 100 miles from you yet God sees me and you at the same time and if you do anything bad, I can’t see it but God will see it and will be angry with you for it and you will tell me all about it. I will be sorry to hear anything bad from any of you. I want all of you to say your prayers to your mother learn your lessons and say them too. I will come after while and be very glad to hear that you are all (good) children. Now, John, I want you to remember good what I told you when I left you at the Courthouse. If I should take sick and die or be killed by the Yankees I should be sorry to leave you a set of / children. But mind what your Ma says to you and don’t be saucy to any body, remember I pray that God will take care of you all be good to Turner and Jeffy. Your father in love.



Burdett – B. Wm. Burdett - see earlier mention

David Taylor – David S. Taylor, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina, Born in Georgia Circa 1833 – Date of Death Unknown – Buried in the McDaniel Cemetery in Mauldin, S.C. There is also a D.T. Taylor listed in the 1860 census as living near McKittrick. He is listed as a 26 year old harness maker, living with his wife Amanda R. who is 25 and children, Wesley W., who is 5, Joseph R. who is 3, and James P. who is one. Also listed in that household is David Taylor a 56 year old farmer.

Andrew Allison – Andrew J. Allison, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina - Cap. Nashville, Tn. -12/16/64 - Camp Douglas(CSR) - "Died Oct. 10 1873 - Age 45 Years" - Buried: Clear Springs Baptist Church. The Allisons live close to the Mckittrick's and the 1860 Greenville census states A.J. lived with his wife Harriet.

G.M. White – Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina – Killed in Action, Franklin, Tn., Mcgavock Cemetery Section 85, Grave 41 – listed as Moses White – there are two Young Moses White and G.M. White.

Wilborn Curry – Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina - Wounded Lovejoy Station - Married: Elizabeth Simpson. W.A. Curry and his wife Elizabeth and son Simpson are listed on page 353 of the 1860 census, Greenville County. They would have been neighbors of the McKittricks, as are most of these men.

Lt. McCrary – Lt. Jesse McCrary – Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina.

Col. Elford – Col. C.J. Elford – Sixteenth South Carolina – Third South Carolina Reserves – Unionist Newspaper Editor prior to the war – Mayor of Greenville – Buried Springwood Cemetery.

Cap. I. Shumate – This is possibly L.H. Shumate, Shumate was involved in the militia in Greenville County and sent four sons to the war. Most served with Company B, Sixteenth South Carolina.

Regt of Laurens – This may well be the unit that later became the Third Battalion or Laurens Battalion. That unit served with Kershaw’s Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia.

General Gist – General States Rights Gist – later commander of the Gist Brigade.

Moseley’s Regt. – the Mosely family was an important one in Laurens District both before and during the war. G.F. Mosely was the Captain of a Laurens Company that was a part of the Ninth Reserves Jun 1862-Jan. 1863.

Col. Chestnutt – Colonel James Chesnut Jr. - See prior letter.

counsel of this state - South Carolina Executive Council – Colonel James Chesnut Jr. was a member.



Columbia, S.C. Feb. 23, 1862

Dear wife

This day find me well I am now at the Hospital. There are three of our boys at the Hospital namely, A.G. Allison, Z.M. White and George Higgins they are improving George Higgins is now the worst he was last breaking out. The Dr. told me a few minutes since that we are all doing well and could soon go home. I have this morning received marching orders from the Sec. of War we are going to the Greenville Regt. to fill out our Regts. And the ranks and be like other folks. My boys are busy cooking their four days rations. Each man has drawn a haversack canteen and old musket. So we leave tomorrow at six o’clock the boys seem tired staying here, we pleased with the idea of getting our company. It seems there has been luck in leisure this time. Col. Chesnutt told me he would not disband my company I had been industrious to get it up which you know is the case I find when one acts the man it generally works well.

So my dear wife I know not when I shall be allowed to see you and my dear little ones but trust in God who will deliver you I hope that I shall be able to rely upon that arm which never fails a man of God visited our camp this morning and give good advice and some good facts to our boys.

My dear when it is convenient I want you to look your best and have your likeness taken and send it by McKinney or some one else this will give some consolation in my absence. When you write direct your letters to Adam’s Run, 16th Regiment, Captain McKittrick you do the best you can in regard to paying your taxes & C. Tell my dear children I am gone to war now, Give my respects to all my neighbors and friends. I have not been sick since I left home. Cousin E. Stenhouse has got home very poorly but I hope will recover. You recollect my order by McKinney. My men up there must soon come now or they will be out after. So farewell my dear wife.

Your affectionate husband

Saml. McKittrick

A.G. Allison – probably A.J. Allsion, see earlier note

Z.M. White – probably G.M. White, see earlier note

George Higgins – George P. Higgins, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina

Greenville Regiment – Sixteenth South Carolina

Col. Chesnutt – Colonel James Chesnut Jr. – See earlier note

McKinney – probably J.J. McKinney, First Sergeant of Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina - KIA Atlanta 8/8/64 – DOW - Brother of Newton Allen McKinney - U.D.C., Vol. 2, page 628 (Listing for burial of J.J. McKinsey?) – Buried Stonewall Cemetery – Griffin, Ga. - Married to Kezia Boyle , sister of Newton McKinney's wife

E. Stenhouse – Eben Stenhouse - The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

Note that McKittrick addresses himself as Captain in this letter.



March 1, 1862

Dear Wife

I am well except a sore throat which troubled me last night. We are in the Greenville Regt. and getting along very well, we expected to have a battle night before last but it proved to be a false alarm, the Regt. was paraded for battle about ten o’clock and march(ed) out with all their equipment. I was office(r) of the day and therefore forbidden to go I and I.C. Baldwin and Riley Fowler now on guard duty. After the alarm was over the Regt. went to bed. I tell you there was some fixing up among the boys all seemed determined to give them the best we had. I hope we shall be able to get a good company now. I do not know when I will be able to get home. General events has forbidden any Furloughs at present. I am trying to do the best I can with my men I am going to get them a Testament each from Dr. Boyce the Chaplain. We do not know when we will have to fight likely before long as the enemy is expected to land near us. So perhaps they may not at this point at all. I feel pretty cool on the subject the battle of the Regt. is now good are all up well now that I have bro. I want you to send my clothes in a bundle by I. T. Perry as there are some doubts about getting roll up what I sent you get Mcring to take them in the Cars with him. I sent him a note I want you to send to him quick send the other things in a box if you can he brings if not you need send them at all. Dear wife do the best you can,

Your husband

McKittrick

Greenville Regt. – Sixteenth South Carolina

I.C. Baldwin – Josiah or Jeremiah Baldwin, probably Josiah C. Baldwin, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina, Died of Illness at home 10/21/63 – Broken Fortunes by Kirkland

Riley Fowler – Fowler, Reilly, Private, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina, listed as Killed in Action at Missionary Ridge by Taylor – possibly the same man as Fowler, George R. who is listed as died in prison – Captured Missionary Ridge(Memory Roll) - Cap. Graysville or Ringold, Ga. (CSR) Died Grave 5811 St. Louis, Mi. (CSR) (Kirkland) Chronic Diarrhea(Kirkland) – George R. Fowler is also listed at buried at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Nashville in some records, there is no recorded grave site at Mt. Olivet.

Dr. Boyce the Chaplain – there is no Boyce listed in Broadfoot serving in either the Sixteenth or as a Chaplain.

I.T. Perry –

McRing –



First Sunday at Camp Greenville March 22, 1862

I am well I have just heard a sermon preached by Rev. Gains from the Text you must be born again. Within 30 yards of the bldg, a poor soldier was mourning over the loss of his wife who he had heard had died in Greenville. I went to see him I could not but feel very sorry for the poor man, especially as the thought passed through my mind that one day (I might) be doomed to hear similar news, God forbid I ever shall. Dear wife a Christian sees many things to disgust the eye and ear. I sometimes almost shudder to think how reckless men are and dear that God will leave us to suffer the reward of our own doings, yet, I hope there is salt enough in the Confederacy to preserve it, Major Poor started home this morning, he heard his wife was very ill.

March 3rd
I am still well I have just come off of dress parade nothing of interest to write today. We have order(s) to move heavy baggage home or somewhere else. General Evans has ordered all the negros out from the coast. I suppose we will soon leave this place though there is no telling what will be done.

March 4th
Dear Wife it is now 9 o’clock there has nothing of interest occurred today. I went with my company into Battalion drill this evening for the first time and did I think tolerably well. My boys are in fine spirits I have said we received a bag of provisions from I.M. Henam.

March 5th
I am still well I had hoped to go home on recruiting service but Gen. Evans has forbidden all Furloughs except in extreme cases of sickness. Col. Elford tried to get me off to home to recruit but Evans broke it up. I hope that some men there will still come. Dear wife I long to see a letter from home I have received no letter from home since I left. I suppose you mailed them to Columbia and no (none) have left there It might (To night) is a merry time in camp some are singing some swearing some laughing and talking and some I hope are praying.

March 6th
Morning Dear wife I am well thank God the health of the Regt. is now good one Captain namely Hodge and one Sergeant I.A. Charks are ordered home to bring all the absentees of the Regt. mine are ordered with the rest. I suppose James Johnson will soon have to come at last. This is orders from Head Quarters. I.T.M. Howard are loading with the boys. Now John, Adaline, Marthy, and Turner I want you all to be good children. Say your prayers and mind your Ma. Remember God sees you every thing you do. While I write I fancy I can almost see you all. Take good car of little Jeffy kiss him for me.

Camp Greenville - the exact location is unknown, but it certainly was near Adams Run, South Carolina. Adams Run is located between Walterboro and Edisto Island. This was a common staging area used to protect the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. The Sixteenth spent a great deal of time near Adams Run.

Rev Gains – T.R. Gaines is Chaplain of Elford's Third South Carolina Reserves – See earlier note.

Major Poor –

General Evans – General Nathan “Shank” Evans - Hero of Ball's Bluff – Commander of a District in South Carolina, he will shortly come into conflict with General Johnson Hagood concerning his conduct at Secessionville (See Patrick Brennon's excellent book, Secessionville). Later he will become the commander of the Evans’ Brigade and come into conflict with nearly everyone he comes into contact with. Evans' was a wild man extraordinaire.

I.M. Heman – It seems likely that the transcription is in error and that this is Lt. J.M. Howard – Howard served with McKittrick in both Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina and Company B, Third State Troops and other units.

Col. Elford – Col. C.J. Elford – See earlier note

General Evans – General Nathan “Shank” Evans

Capt Hodge – Captain Davis Hodge, Company H, Sixteenth South Carolina, also Captain of Company D, Third South Carolina Reserves – name is also spelled Hodges – Buried at North Fork Baptist Church – Upper Greenville County

Sergeant I.A. Charks – probably one of the Charles boys in Company B. - Mary Charles was married to Thomas Goldsmith of Company I and the Goldsmith family mentioned earlier. The Charles family was well known in the lower end of Greenville County. There are two brothers in Company B of the Sixteenth who served as Sergeants in that company, Peter G. and J.O. Charles. John B. Charles also served as a Corporal in that company. These two men, Hodge and Charles would have represented both the Upper and Lower end of the county. They would have been a logical choice to "encourage" late arrivals to head to Charleston. The only othe possiblity appears to be Sergeant D.I.J. Chandler of Company F.

James Johnson – J.P. Johnson served as a Sergeant in Company I of the Sixteenth. J.W. Johnson served as a Corporal with the Sixteenth and maybe the same as W.J. Jonson that served with Elford’s Third. See earlier note.

I.T.M. Howard - It seems likely that the transcription is in error and that this is Lt. J.M. Howard – Howard served with McKittrick in both Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina and Company B, Third State Troops



March 7, 1862
Dear wife,

I (am) well. We had light snow here this morning it is pretty cold here for the coast. I am the officer of the day for 24 hours the officer has to superintend all regt. rations in camp. There is great excitement in camp about volunteering for the war. Some are willing to go into it. But a large majority are not willing. I think I am among the latter class. I want to see some others show their hand first. There is talk of drafting men for the war if they do not volunteer. I do not think this regt. is situated to go in for the war. Dear wife you scarcely know the pleasure a letter from you would give me. Evening. Augustus Howard has returned and tells me he saw you I did hope to receive a letter all in vain. I am glad to hear from home William Davis has come with . Direct your letter to Adam’s Run, 16th Regt. S.C. Cap McKittrick it is now 3 o’clock. Dear wife farewell, Your affectionate husband.
Saml McKittrick

Snow in Adams Run – this would have been a most unusual event.

Volunteering for the war – As you can see, Captain McKittrick and his men seem to show little enthusiasm for the idea of volunteering for the war. The Sixteenth was assembled from men who were slow to volunteer as we have seen. Many are from a Unionist heritage that involves leaders like Benjamin Perry, who were reluctant to join South Carolina in leaving the Union. Volunteering for the war will be a slow go with the Sixteenth South Carolina

Augustus Howard – Private, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina

Wm. Davis – the most likely candidate seems to be G.W. Davis, a private who served in Company B and C of the Sixteenth, however he is known as George. The only other Sixteenth member who fits the description is Davis, W.T., Lieutenant, Company H, Buried in the Wilson Cemetery, Greer, S.C., on Main St. Ext. on left side of street, stones were broken up by vandals. T.W. Davis serves with McKittrick later in Elford’s Third Reserves, Company B and is another possibility.

Cap. McKittrick – Again we see McKittrick using the title of Captain.



Camp Greenville March 12, 1862

Dear Wife

I am through the blessing of Heaven in good health I have been well ever since I left home I received your affectionate letter yesterday evening the letter was dated 22, February it was detained at Columbia. O the pleasure it gave me to hear my loved ones I could almost see you all. Tell John how glad I am that he is doing what I told him I hope I shall one day see you all. Tell Turner that there are no Yankees here to kill.

Blessed children how I love them. May God preserve them there is great excitement here now about the last call for volunteers some are talking of volunteering and are not. I do not wish to discourage others in this matter. But in my situation I do not feel inclined to volunteer for the war. I have volunteered twice if that will not do I believe I will stand a draft before I will go it again. The men of this Regt. are placed on equality with those at home.

There are efforts making here to get this Regt. to volunteer for the war. I think that I will stand my draft first. I will take my hand with them at home. I think it unfair to draft men for 3 years or during the war. I would like to have your opinion on this subject I do not think near all the boys will go it for the war. My company cannot go as a company because it is not full. If we all would volunteer we would have the chance to recruit but as we are we cannot for a less term than 3 years or the war. A regt. can go as a Regt. or a company as a company. I could not recruit for 12 months in Georgia, I cant see how I could for the war. I wish you to keep this letter secret for a while at least. I hope to see you all before long. I received Mr. Burdette’s letter. Sergt. Clark (Charles?) will extend his furlough I suppose he not to come here yet. I hope Rose has got better. Dear wife I know that you are dong the best you can. I will let you know shortly (what) the Regt. will do I think I know what I shall do.

Your affectionate husband until death,

Saml. McKittrick

This is almost certainly the same sergeant that is mentioned earlier. Captain McKittrick is even more outspoken about enlisting for the war. It appears to be a common attitude in the Sixteenth.

Mr. Burditt - Jesse Burdett, see earlier entry

Rose - Rose and Lin are probably the two servants mentioned in the 1860 census as being owned by McKittrick.



Camp Greenville March 14th 1862

Dear Wife

This morning finds me in good health. O how thankful I should be for this blessing. I received your letter by McKinney Five Dollars the clothes and books. I have sent to the Dept. for the other things. Your letter brought both sorrow and joy. I am glad to hear that you yourself was up and here let me caution you not (to) out do yourself remember my dear you are the stay of the family. I feel that I have a companion that I rely upon in all adversity. I want you to hire a hand a while to help line work. I do not expect you to as you would but do as you can. Get Mr. Burdett or some one else to get Stokes Thaison or someone else to alter the coal if it can be done. You can do without repairing any fence but the lane fence from the orchard to the Bars (Barns) below. Perhaps you can swap a day or two with some friend. I am sorry to hear your report about your neighbors. I tell you my dear wife I have found that we have but few earthly friends upon whom we can rely in time of need I want you to bear with cold hands as well you can remember the Lord will provide and you have at least one who will not forsake you. If I should ever see you and hope I will I could not refrain from tears when I read how my dear son improved my parting advice and how (he) talked to the other children. I feel that he will be a comfort in time (to) come. There are few minutes pass but my thoughts are home to you and my dear children. I often think my case a hard one, but when I see so many more in my condition, I try to be satisfied with my lot. The sight (of) the things you sent me brought (to me) recollection of home. There has been great uneasiness in the Regt. for some days in regard to the last call, supposing us to have (to) stand a draft but now the opinion is general that we will go on our time out. I am sorry that no recruits came down. I apprehend danger of my company yet. I feel that I have done all I can come what will as you advise me I will try and be contented. This is confidential I am glad that I do not have to stand my draft in Greenville.

McKinney - See Earlier Entry

Mr. Burdette - Jesse Burdette - See earlier entry

Stokes Thaison -

There is little doubt that McKittrick and his men will not be volunteering for the war. This is the last letter from Camp Greenville and I have no idea if he moved or the new name of Camp Leesburg was adopted. Camp Leesburg is an Adams Run Camp that is well associated with the Sixteenth South Carolina.



Camp Leesburg April 1, 1862

Dear Wife

I am well through the blessing of Heaven I hastily write you a few lines this morning and send by Thos. Austin. I have enjoyed good health since I left home. My company have elected Newton Babb 1st Lt. Babb received 22 votes Mr. Ragsdale 17 and William Austin 2. I am sorry that Austin made such a poor race he seems mortified at it himself. Mr. Ragsdale is much of a gentlemen, I think and the best Officer in the Regt. Mr. Babb had been down here all the time, the men who had been here took that into consideration. I did not try to control them. So we are to be mustered in next Wednesday with a full company I hope. We can every day or night hear the enemy’s guns they are bombing the coast near us. When I came down we expected a battle every day but it has not come on yet, and think likely will not here. We had the Governor to review us the other day and give us a fine speech he is anxious for the Regt. to go into it for the war but this it will not do now. I do not think that were the officers themselves all willing we thing that we are doing well enough. I hope that you are getting along with your farm pretty well, the weather is getting warm. Tell John, Adaline, Martha, Turner and Jeffy to be good children mind their Ma and say their prayers. Do the best you can I hope I will hear for you this day. O how often I think of you, be sure to write every week it give me satisfaction to hear from you. We hope to leave here within a few weeks for some healthier location. Your affectionate husband. S. McKittrick

Thos. Austin – Thomas J. Austin - Promoted to Lieutenant 3-64, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina. There are a number of Thomas Austins.

Newton Babb - Promoted First Lt. 3/62 - Promoted Captain 7/62 - Sick St. Mary's Lagrange 6/63 (CSR) –DOD - Lagrange, Alabama -11/6/63- Company I, Sixteenth S.C. - B.A. Goodlett (Captain/Company K) received his effects at hospital: silver watch, sword and sash, coat, vest, brush, handkerchief, hat, shoes, two shirts, 2 drawers, 4 socks, oil cloth and $70.00.

Mr. Ragsdale – Unknown at this time, he is not listed with the Sixteenth South Carolina or with Elford’s Third State Reserves.

Wm. Austin – Wm. J Austin – Lieutenant, Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina

Governor -

McKittrick has certainly joined the men of Company I of the Sixteenth at this time. I suspect the move to Camp Leesburg is a herald of that event.



Camp Leesburgh, April 22, 1862

Dear Wife,

I am happy to be able to say to you that I am nearly well I am much better than I was when I wrote last, although I have not been able to go on duty yet, but hope I will be able within a few days.

My dear wife I can tell you there has been a perfect Revolution taken place within one week. You know the change Congress has made namely all men 18 and over 35 years are to be discharged within 90 days or perhaps sooner. I have been at a stand to know what to do. But after considering my condition over, and everything between duty and Interest I just say to you that I am coming home as soon as I am honorably discharged, this means now (this news) no doubt is gratifying to you, you and my dear children lay nearer my heart that the captaincy of a company The company were anxious for me to go as their Captain. I could be elected without any opposition. But I just told them I could not go the war. I am sorry and so are they but I do not feel bound to go under the circumstances. I suppose I will be able to go home as soon as the Reorganization takes place and that I suppose will be within a few day, or perhaps it may be within a month or over yet. I think that nearly all the men over 35 will go home. Capt. Roberts and Hodge and I think several other Captains and many other officers and Privates will go home the opinion here is that the men ought to go home. See my dear wife I hope you can get along some how until I can relieve you. Tell my dear children that I hope that I shall see them, and stay with them a little longer. There is great canvassing for office, there is to be a change from Col. to Lieut. John Howard and Nicilus Wood are coming home. Newton Babb is not old enough yet. Elford and McCullough for Col. Ioor and some body else for Lieut. Col. and some 3 or 4 I think for Major. I have advised my company and they are anxious to select them a man that will make them an officer. I have been anxiously looking for a letter from you for a week but yet none. I have received none since Mr. Wise came down. I then get one dated the 5th inst. I have just received one from Mr. W.T. Ashmore which gave me satisfaction as it stated that you were all well and Bacon sold at .30 cts. Per lb. Meat is scarce here today, the Regt. killing sheep with a vengeance I suppose there will be some (30) or 40 killed here this evening. I hope I shall receive a letter soon. I hope to see you soon. Your affectionate husband until death.
Saml. McKittrick

Captain Roberts - Roberts, Thomas B. – Captain, Company A, Sixteenth S.C. - Served until 4/62(MR) - Company B, Third State Troops (6/62-1/63 -Captain T.B. Roberts) - See First Regiment State Troops (8/63-2/64) - Col. T.B. Roberts. McKittrick will serve with Roberts in Company B, Third State Troops. Roberts is buried in Springwood Cemetery in Greenville, S.C.

Captain Hodge - Captain Davis Hodge, Company H, Sixteenth South Carolina, also Captain of Company D, Third South Carolina Reserves (6/62-1/63)– name is also spelled Hodges – Buried at North Fork Baptist Church – Upper Greenville County

Lt. John Howard - Howard, John M. - See Company B, Third S.C. Reserves, served as a Private; See First Regiment State Troops, Company K (8/63-2/64 - Roberts), Lieutenant in Samuel McKittrick’s Company

Nicilus Wood - Wood, Nicholas J – Lieutenant Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina - Wounded 8/29/63 (CSR) - See Company B, Third State Troops, Sergeant.

Newton Babb – Captain, Company I, Sixteenth S.C. – See earlier listing

Elford – Colonel C.J. Elford – Elford would be defeated by McCullough in the mentioned election and would command the Third S.C. Reserves from June of 1862 to January of 1863.

McCullough – Col. James McCullough – would serve as commander of the Sixteenth from this election until the end of the Atlanta battles. He would then enter the S.C. House.

Ioor – Major Wallace B. Ioor – will be elected Lieutenant Colonel of the Sixteenth and will become one of the more shadowy figurers of the unit, he is virtually lost in time.

Mr. Wise -

Mr. W.T. Ashmore – is a neighbor of McKittrick's, the 1860 census lists him as William T. Ashmore aged 55, a farmer living with his wife Nancy.

This is the reorganization of 1862, the first winnowing, all of the older officers and men are sent home. Many will return first to the Reserve Organizations then to active service with active units. Certainly McKittrick will be back, his next incarnation as a Sergeant in Elford’s Third South Carolina Reserves serving from June of 1862 to January of 1863. This will be followed by service as a Private in Company B, First Battalion South Carolina Sharpshooters. Then he will serve as a Captain in Company K of the First State Troops or Reserves from August of 1863 to February of 1864. Finally he will return to Company I of the Sixteenth S.C.



Part Two
Sergeant McKittrick
Company B - Captain T.B. Roberts
Third South Carolina Reserves 8/62-1/63) - Colonel C.J. Elford

McKittrick returns to service in June of 1862 as a Sergeant in Company B of the Third South Carolina Reserves (June, 1862 to January, 1863) under the command of Captain T.B. Roberts commanding Company B. Roberts is formerly of the Sixteen. McKittrick once again finds himself under the command of Col. C.J. Elford commanding the regiment. Moving to the coast in November of 1862 the letters of Sergeant McKittrick continue as the unit moves first to Columbia and then to Pocatalico on the Charleston Savannah Rail Road.


Camp Hampton Nov. 15, 1862
Dear Wife


I find myself again in camp. I am well hoping you are all well and doing well. We came on to Columbia on Thursday and remained there until this morning. We have just finished pitching our tents. I think we will remain here until the rest of the Regt. comes down we have about 200 men in camp. I suppose it will be better at present for the Regt. that they came on when they did as we may get a better supply of Tents & C. I was stratined whether to come or stay. But I hope I will get on till my neighbors come down I have not got the .... you either did not put it in or I have lost it and send it on by my neighbors. I was at cousin Eben Stevens (Stenhouse) they are improving in health. I sent $180 home by Thomas Haden (Peden) he will be up next week you must go down sometime next week to Thos. Harrison’s and get the money the other hundred is conterfeit I understand I can get good money at Charleston I you to send me the 4 $50 bill that Jas Wright has if you have got it and if it is one that is called in namely Hoyce and Luding.

November 16
I am well this morning we are commencing the routine of camp duty. We have no Chaplain down here yet. I understand that Tilman Gains is appointed. I hope that you are getting on with your wheat sowing. If you have not got any salt yet from Wright do not get any until I write again Cousin E.S. thinks I can do better below. I hear that every soldier will draw 8 quarts of salt. I want John to be the best boy in school and learn the fastest and Adaline and Martha to be the best girls. Dear wife I have done the best I can for you if I never come back but I trust in God I will this world has little charms at present I have one consolation that you will do the best you can for my children Seventeen years faithfulness has proved found this. I am acting orderly Sergeant in the absence of others. When you write direct your letters thus Samuel McKittrick, Company B 3D Regt. South Carolina Reserves care Captain Roberts, Columbia, S.C. Dear wife do be punctual in writing as it afford me so much pleasure. Be sure to send the note to Robert Teage and he can let Burdett see it. Your loving husband until death.
Samuel McKittrick

Camp Hampton – located in Columbia near where the S.C. State Archives is currently located.

.... - this is probably testament, he mentions the fact it is missing in a later letter.

Eben Stenhouse – The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

Thomas Haden – Maybe Thomas Peden – another name well known in the Fairview Community and at Fairview Presbyterian Church is the name of Peden. Thomas Peden saw service in Company H of the Palmetto Artillery Battalion and later in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina. Thomas Peden is buried very near Capt. McKittrick at Fairview Presbyterian.

Thomas Harrison – Harrison is another common name in the Fairview Community.

Jas. Wright – a neighbor from across the Laurens County line. He is serving as a lieutenant in the 9th S.C. Reserves from Laurens County.

Tilman Gains – T.R. Gaines, Chaplain of Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves

Cousin E.S. – Eben Stenhouse - The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

Robert Teage – Robert League – Corporal – Company B, Third S.C. Reserves - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters

Burdett – Jesse Burdett is serving in this unit. He is a neighbor and the father of David W. Burdett who is mentioned in earlier letters. He is also the father of Benjamin William Burdett. In 1860 the census listed Jesse as 45 and D.W. as 16 and B.W. as 15.

Salt was a staple of live and one of the few ways to cure meat. Traffic by men serving on the coast from the mountains was a primary means of gaining income and profit. It is a common topic of conversation among almost all of the mountain soldiers serving on the coast.

Camp Hampton November 19, 1862
Dear Wife


Through the blessing of Heaven I am well and have been ever since I came to camp. I am fareing finely. We draw plenty of good Beef three-fourth of our bread cornmeal and the other fourth flour we draw rice, salt, and soap. My appetite has been very good ever since I came to camp.

Another Regt. From Richmond have just arrived and are going into camp now and I understand that the Laurens Regt. will be here within a day or two. It is thought that we will remain here about a week and the set out for the coast. A mess of eight men draw no cooking utensils but one camp kettle I sent to Columbia on Monday and bought one water bucket at $1.50, on spider at $2.00 and wash pan at $1.00 every thing is very high in Columbia. Pocketknives are selling at $7.00 coffee $2.00 per lb. Salt is selling at $2.50 per sack (that is Liverpool). I will endeaver to write so as you will get my letter on Friday. I want one letter at least every week and sometimes two. We had a prayer meeting on last Sunday and old gentleman by the name of Vonge led in the service it was a solemn time with us when the speaker referd to the situation in which we were placed there were many eyes in tears, the audience seemed to realize their dangerous situation.

Dear wife my mind ran swiftly home and it endeavored to think of that home where trouble will end and where if we never meet in this world we will meet to have no more such parting scenes as we have had. Dear wife I want you to train our dear children for Heaven. I have little time in daytime to write and read. We drill 4 hours in the day beside other duties but this is better for our health I was sorry that I or we forgot a Testament, I enquired for one in Columbia but I found in one (Glapis Book Store). We will all get Testament shortly there is a great ….. here today this Columbia Regt. filling up no doubt greatly against the grain of many of them, if you see or can send word to Mr. Teague and Burdett tell them to bring some Rye send some more goobers. Read this and explain it to the children Kiss Turner and Jeff for me. Your affectionate husband till death.

Samuel McKittrick

Laurens Regt. – probably the 9th S.C. Reserves (June, 1862 to January, 1863)

Vonge – This maybe Vaughn, if so W.P. Vaughn is serving in Company B with McKittrick.

Glapis Book Store –

Columbia Regt. –

Teague – Corporal Robert League - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Burdett – Jesse Burdett is serving in this unit. He is a neighbor and the father of David W. Burdett who is mentioned in earlier letters. He is also the father of Benjamin William Burdett. In 1860 the census listed Jesse as 45 and D.W. as 16 and B.W. as 15.

December 3, 1862 Wednesday

Dear Wife

I am through the blessing of Heaven well though somewhat fatigued. I have a fine appetite for Beef and Potatoes. Dear wife I left you last Wednesday at Hampton on Thursday evening we received orders to cook 5 days rations to march to Pocatalico on Friday morning at half past 8 o’clock we struck tents and embarked on the South C.R.R. about 8 o’clock. We arrived at Charleston about one o’clock at night. We rode in Box cars we had a very disagreeable trip as it was so cold. On Saturday we struck up camp near Charleston and remain(ed) there till yesterday morning I saw many of (the) neighbors on the way to Charleston. James Wright and Josiah Leak among the rest they told that Lewis Durall would be drawn within a few days. Wright said he had not got the salt but thought it would soon come or perhaps had before that time I told him. I wanted it if I could not get any in Charleston. I was on Parade when I saw him about sun up I thought that I would see him again but I failed to get the chance. I could get no salt in Charleston for less that $24 per bushel. I do not know whether Mrs. Wright will get any salt or not. I will send to cousin Eben Stenhouse for some and you get more that you need at present you can sell it for more than you for more than you give I will get him to send you one bushel and a half to Greenville and you can inquire when it will come or whether it has come. I will send to him shortly as you may soon need it. There is a great demand for salt about Charleston. If you get any from Laurens and some form Columbia you must find out the price and do the best you can with it. On yesterday morning we left Charleston and arrived her at Pocotalico about dusk last night we struck up for the night and are her yet. The Regts. are clearing out a permanent camp ground today I have lately eat a hearty dinner of Potatoes rice & C. We are faring very well at present the good things that come from home are getting low. We have a mess of S.R. ..agor I.W. Howard, D. Burdett, Mr. Wardell of Greenville Villong (Village) who is also commissary of our co. We have a fine little mess. We drew one pound of beef and plenty of meal, Rice. Serganter Arminger and C. We got plenty to eat generally and if we should not we can buy iy (it) we get near half bus. Potatoes of .25 cents. I walked in company with other friends over the battle ground this morning and saw the sad desolation.

O (I) also saw the body of a dead Yankee there are some 25 buried in one grave there bodies or at least those on top are not covered more that 10 or 12 inches there was a hole scratched down near the corpse I felt a strange curiosity to see how near it was and how it appeared. I took up a stick and scratched away a little dirt and so I probed the body of a Yankee. I plainly saw the skin and felt the spungy carcass. O how cruelties of war to see men buried like brutes and our sympathies blunted at the sight. I confess I did not have that sympathy that I usually have at the grave. Near by the above grave lies the body of a Yankee Captain. I viewed the effects on the battlefield and returned fully satisfied that it is not a pleasant place in the heat of action. I hope the Lord will shield my heart in the house of battles. I suppose we will remain here for sometime it is now threatening rain. I do not know when I will be home perhaps not within the 90 days and perhaps not then I have no definite idea what will become of us at present.

Dear wife do the best you can I hope one day to see you in peace and enjoy your company when the turmoils of this unholy war will have closed. Tell John Adaline and Martha to be good children at school and learn all they can and (not to) quarl and fight with the other children or among themselves (tell) Turner to be a good boy and mind, Jeff I want all my children to be good and say their prayers. There are few moments that pass but my thoughts with a longing desire run home to you and my dear children. I know not how to direct you about our matters do the best you can and I will be satisfied. When you write direct your letter as follows (To Sergeant McKittrick Pocotaligo Co. B Third Regt. First S.C. Reserves. Fail not to write when ever (you) can remember or at least once a week. Mr. Teague, I.M. Howard, and D. Burdett are all well and doing well give my love to all my inquiring friends. If (you) get the salt let me know in your letter and the news in general. I want to know how far the children have go in their books & C. Dear wife farewell for a short time remember me at a throne of grace as I you do as a husband til death

Samuel McKittrick

James Wright – First Lieutenant James M. Wright, Company D, Ninth Reserves, June 1862 to Jan 1863, Laurens District

Josiah Leak – Private, Company D, Ninth Reserves, June 1862 to Jan 1863, Laurens District

Lewis Durall – L.J. Duvall - Private, Company D, Ninth Reserves, June 1862 to Jan 1863, Laurens District

Eben Stenhouse – The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F.

S.R. …. – Probably Lt. S.B. Hutchings, Company B, Elford’s Third

I.W. Howard – John M. Howard – Lt., Company I, Sixteenth – Private, Company B, Elford’s Third – Lt., First Regiment State Troops, Company K (8/63-2/64)

Burdett – See earlier entries.

Mr. Wardell– Theodore Wardell - Company B, Elford’s Third Reserves

Serganter Arminger and C. –

Mr. Teague – Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

I.M. Howard – J.M. Howard, Company B, Elford’s Third

Pocotaligo – Station of the Charleston Savannah Railroad – the bodies referred to are the product of the Union advance against the railroad at Pocotaligo. The battle was fought October 26, 1862. There is an excellent Confederate account in Charleston Light Dragoons by Edward Wells. Wells reports the burial of 56 bodies. Confederate Forces were under the command of Colonel, later General W.S. Walker. For a full report of the action see Confederate Military History, Vol 5, by Capers page 101.

Pocotaligo Camp Perry Dec. 7, 1862 Sunday Afternoon
Dear wife this beautiful Sunday evening finds me through a merciful Provindence enjoying good health hoping these lines will find you and my dear children enjoying a similar blessing. We are now within a mile of (the) Savannah Rail Road or between the road and old Pocotaligo or about a mile from the battleground. We have had a wet time for a few days. Where we camped when we arrived from Tuesday till Saturday morning at which time we came to this place and we are not pleased with the place on account of its dampness. The Col. is now gone to look (about) out a better place in this marchey country it is hard to get a pleasant camp ground. I hear but little talk of a battle yet though there is no telling when or how soon we may have one. It is very cold for this climate here now. I enjoyed the privilege of having a sermon from our Chaplain Rev. T. Gains who arrived yesterday evening from the tex I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ. My dear it is a sublime scene to me to see 3 or 4 hundred men gathered in the street all seeming anxious to hear the Gospel. We gathered around this morning each man had to stand or sit on the ground but as unpleasant as it was thee was good attention given I hope we have many who feel that they have souls to be saved. When I met Re. Gains this morning for the first time with the hand he saluted me. He placed a camp hymn book in mine and soon gave me a budel to distribute which the soldiers received with eagerness and tractlikness. There is preaching at this moment in the Regt. I hope that we will be blessed as a Regt. My dear there is no consolation and there is although we are far from each other in the flesh we are united in the spirit.

I joyfully received your letter of the Inst. yesterday evening. Just as I was about to eat supper and you can imagine how I felt when I read that all well and doing well. This sustains me amidst the trials and fatigue of camp life. You have managed the beef very well I have no doubt and as to matters I can I think you had better pay him in Confederate money as corn is better than money. I cannot say when I will be able to get home. R. Teague, I.M. Howard D. Burchitt and myself make one mess. We are all well pleased we have bought our own cooking utensils and cook plentifully and eat all we cook. We are all hearty fortunately.

Monday 8
Dear companion I am still well. I have had a hard days work the ground from which we were camping was too low and wet on yesterday evening 10 volunteers were called from each company to work on the new camp gournd I volunteered to work we had 4 hours hard work leveling the ground. The Regt. moved this evening. We have been much hurried to get here it (is) now 9 o’clock at night the guard and last of that just came to camp. We have been much troubled in moving it, a very small job. I just finished my hasty gotten supper and although very tired I feel like enjoying the pleasure of letting you know how things go on in camp. There are now a variety of pursuits some on cooking, some eating some sleeping some guarding the camp and many sitting around their fires talking over their domestic affairs and surmising various notions about the war and wondering whether and hoping that we get home at the end of 90 days. Our new ground I hope will be much better than the old one as it is much higher and dryer land. We have or tent floored with plank. We have carried our plank about a mile and fortunate we are to get it Last night I had the pleasure to attend a prayer meeting I heard some persons engaged in singing I went out to see what was going on and I saw 2 different groups assembled and engaged singing and prayer. Although the night was cold yet the spirit seemed to be at work. I find that the tented field can be a worshiping temple to the living God. I wish you could witness the scene of camp life for a few days.

Dec. 9 Tuesday night I am well I have been busy fixing for housekeeping having moved yesterday. You ought to have seen I.M. Howard and D Burchett and myself start with our dirty cloth to a pond nearby with our camp kettle to boil them in and camp bucket to wash them in. all of us being new hands I cannot brag on our washings yet we took lessons from an old Irishman who was engaged nearby we got them clean but not white. I have nothing more that will interest you I believe. Mr. Blewfort Nelson who lives near G.T. Hughes is gone home to visit his sick family and will return about Tuesday or Wednesday. R. Teague and I.M. Howard have sent for some possessions from home. If you and Mrs. Teague and Mrs. Burditt can manage to get us some sent to his house he could bring it. We want some flour butter and bacon you can get some butter from some neighbors and send a few pounds of flour. We want a little more variety now I know you have no bacon or port to spare each one should make what they send. When you write direct your letter to Sergeant McKittrick Co. B 3rd Regt. S.C. Reserves Camp Goldsmith, Pocotaligo S.C. our camp is named in honor of Wm. Goldsmith, Quartermaster. We have had very cold weather for a few days I have seen ice for a few mornings. I think the weather will moderate the men are all well. Our Regt. Generally are healthy. I have never enjoyed better health for the length of time (I) have been away. I hope I will be permitted to enjoy good health through the campaign Wednesday morning 10 o’clock I and all our mess are well. I had a hearty breakfast I have drilled one hour before it this morning. It is still cold here I must close be sure to write regularly to your affectionate husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Col. – Colonel C.J. Elford

Chaplain Rev. T Gains Gospel of Christ - T.R. Gaines, Chaplain of Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves

R. Teague – Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

I.M. Howard -– John M. Howard – Lt., Company I, Sixteenth – Private, Company B, Elford’s Third – Lt., First Regiment State Troops, Company K (8/63-2/64)

D. Burchitt - is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as David Wilcott Burdett, he will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves. B. Wm. Burdett is the older brother and is listed as 16 in the 1860 census he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Mr. Blewfort Nelson – Private T.B. Nelson, Company B, Elford’s Third

G.T. Hughes –

Mrs. Teague – wife of Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third

Mrs. Burdett – wife of D or Jesse Burdett

Wm Goldsmith – Captain – Quartermaster Sixteenth South Carolina – Staff Officer, Quartermaster, Elford’s Third South Carolina Reserves

Camp Goldsmith December 27,1862
Dear wife

I am well. The day I left home I stayed at Col. Hokes we set sail on Christmas morning we arrived in Columbia near sundown we stayed about one half hour at that place and set out for Charleston I had no time to call on Cousin Eben or Thomas Stenhouse we arrived safely at Charleston about 2 o’clock that night I had no time (to) hunt up Jas. Anderson and L. J. Small or to visit the inspector’s office in regard to my counterfeit money. I had to stick closely to my provisions. We left the depot near Charleston for this place about 11 o’clock and arrived safely at about 2 o’clock. I found my mess all well and doing well. The contents of our box hightened their enjoyment. I got the boxes all through safely. I had to pay but .50cts on my box and .25 cts on the small ones to get them hauled from depot to depot, everything came on safely. The company that came down brought a great many boxes. I had 6 in my care all came on safely. There have been four deaths in the Regt. since I left all men for Pickens Dist. Our company are all well or nearly so. The Regt. appears to enjoy Christmas finely. There have been but little duty done for a few days past. The Legislature have past an act allowing the Reserves to elect their Field Officers. I believe that this Regt. are going to go on as they are the remaining past the 90 days and their (then) I know not what will be done. There seems to be no prospect of a fight soon all is quiet at present. Mr. McKee Thomson is going home to oversee for Wm. Goldsmith all right I suppose by him. I send this letter We brought all new men to our company. It (is) now raining here, the prospect is fair for a wet night. I feel somewhat wearied after my return from my trip down I want John Adaline and Martha to be good children learn right ahead at school mind what Mr. Teague says to the(m). I have nothing of interest so soon after coming from home. Direct your letters to me as before be sure to write regularly. Kiss the children for me and remember me as your loving husband till death.

Samuel McKittrick

Col Hoke’s – Probably Colonel David Hoke, Sheriff of Greenville County, appointed by the Governor, 1844-1848. Hoke was involved with several attempts to develop roads and railroads in Greenville County, including the railroad proposed in 1846 and the Ashville Plank Road of 1851. In the second endeavor we find mention of other well known names including C.J. Elford, E.D. Earle and others. Hoke was deeply involved in the militia prior to the war.

Eben Stenhouse – The 1860 census enumerates the following on page 32 of Richland County. Ebenezer Stenhouse, 27 years of age, W/M, merchant; Jennet, 27 years of age, W/F; William B. 3 years of age W/F; Ebenezer B., 1 year of age W/M; William Barkley 77 years of age, W/M; and Agnes Barkley, 83 years of age, W/F

Thomas Stenhouse –

Jas. Anderson – Private, Company A, Ninth S.C. Reserves (Jun., 1862 – Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

L.J. Small – L.J. Duvall – Company D, Ninth S.C. Reserves (Jun, 1862- Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

McKee Thomson – There is a Corporal T.B. Thompson in Company B of Elford’s Third

Camp Goldsmith January 9, 1863
Dear wife

Having a little leisure I seat myself down to inform you how I am getting along, I am through the mercy of God enjoying fine health. I think I have improved in flesh since I left home. I have not missed a meal since I left home. I hope you have this day received my last letter which I started to you last Tuesday. I have nothing particular now. There are several cases of measles in camp. Middleton Jones is unwell, perhaps he may have measles he is at the Hospital four or five miles from here. Nicholas Wood is gone home to visit his sick family I hope you will go and see him and send a letter by him as it does me good to see any person who has recently seen you. I know my dear that you are doing the best you can and that you feel lonely in my absence but I do hope that we will be permitted one day to enjoy that precious privilege. It is thought that we will be allowed to return home at the end of 90 days which will be about the 10th of February. I cannot hope too strong in so much as we are bound to our duty as men. I know you never want your husband disgraced in flinching from his duty. It is for my dear wife and children that I am here in part. Our Chaplain is absent still I wish he would return I think we could have some precious seasons. I often think of the many unmolested privileges I have enjoyed with you in setting by your side in our pew. But you set alone and perhaps forever. We must trust and pray for a return of better times. I have just heard that another man is dead at the Hospital 5 have died out of one company from Pickens none have died from our company. We have been blessed indeed and tomorrow.

Jan. 10, 1862 Dear wife I am still well there is nothing very interesting in camp today we drew out ammunition I hear there are some signs of attack near Charleston. Or Regt. was inspected today as it is on every Saturday. We are ready for an emergency. Our Preacher has just returned to camp. This morning threatened rain but it has rained but little and is quite warm. T. Goldsmith has been quiet sick I think he will not be able to do any more service soon. I am acting First Sergeant. I was 3d and now I suppose I am 2nd as Hanning who is 3rd is appointed Sgt. Maj. And Goldsmith being sick I act as 1st. Captain Roberts has just returned home is back in camp. Rebert Leag (League) is going home you can get all the news from him. I know you will go immediately to see him and get all the news. Nothing more to interest you. Remember me my dear wife in your prayers. Your affectionate husband till death
S. McKittrick

Dear Children John Adaline Martha and Turner I want you all to be good children when I get home and your ma tell me that any of you have been saying bad words or doing ugly things I will be very sorry but more than that God will see all you do and be angry with you and cause you to feel bad because you have done badly. I want you all to mind your ma do what she tells you and say your prayers to her and remember that I often remember and pray for you. Your loving father S.Mc

Rose and Line I will say word to you I hope you are doing the best you can I want you to be obedient to your mistress and remember that you give an account to God for your conduct in life. Try to live, as Christians so you can meet God in fear, your master in the flesh.

Samuel McKittrick

Middleton Jones – Maybe J.M. Jones, Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company B, (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

Nicholas Wood – Lt. Nicholas J. Wood, Company I, Sixteenth S.C. – Sergeant N.J. Wood, Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves

T. Goldsmith – Thomas Goldsmith – Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves – Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina

Hanning – Sergeant Major Norman Henning – Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves – Company A, Sixteenth South Carolina – Company B, Second South Carolina – Killed at the Battle of Bentonville

Capt. Roberts – Capt. T.B. Roberts, Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves

Robert League – Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Rose and Lin - Mckittrick owned to female slaves according to the 1860 census.

Camp Goldsmith January 12, 1863
Dear wife

I am by the mercy of God well this morning. I hope by this time that you have received two letters one by mail and the by Mr. Teague since yours was written. My dear nothing is farther from my intention then to omit writing to you but for this pleasure I could hardly endure my situation I fancy the vision of writing near 10 o’clock and our dear little children all quietly sleeping O could I have been there to bear you company but I trust I will one day be allowed to enjoy this privilidge. I received your kind letter yesterday evening I am truly gratified to hear that you are getting on well. I find you are trading very well, here after I want you to start your letter to me on Tuesday instead of Friday as we have no mail from the Rail Road on Sunday which makes it one day longer getting to me.

If you start a letter on Tuesday I get it on Thursday if it comes direct. I am getting on I hope well. We have fine meetings now our Chaplain is laboring it appears faithfully. We have the promise of a visit this week from Rev. T. Robertson and W.T. Farrow both of them are the men for this place. On last Sunday night we had a prayer meeting many attended it. I was called on to say a few words in exhortation which I attempted to do in my humble way. I hope there are many here who feel they have souls to save. I intended to try to do my duty I felt a diffedence to speak a word in public but then I felt it to be my duty. Our officers are sick and absent today all but Lieut. Roberts who told me he had not the ability to command the corp and requested me to take charge of it. I have today the men appear to be pleased with my performance.

I want a full letter when friend Teague returns I have heard nothing from Jas. Anderson yet I hear that his Regt. is at Charleston perhaps he may be at home or from Lt. Durah. I want you to do things as you think best at home if you can make a Negro trade do so of if you can lend money to good hands do so you can get counsel from some one. Never fail to write Give Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore and Mr. Matox and Mr. Stokes families my respects and them to write to me. I want the children to learn right ahead and beat the whole school. I know I have smart children. My dear wife remember me at a Throne of Grace. There is considerable excitement here about Smallpox there is said to be a case at the Hospital some 4 or 5 miles from here. I was vaccinated on yesterday with vacccinnating scab. About all the Regt. have been vaccinated. Thos. Goldsmith is still improving and intends to go home as soon as he is able. The Grenville Regt. is gone again to North Carolina. Moor Soon.

15 minutes after 8 o’clock at night I have just called the Roll I must now finish my letter to mail in the morning. Rev. T Robertson arrived in camp this evening and preached to night. We had a solemn time indeed 2 men came up to be prayed for I hope we will have a pleasant time. His sermon was very practable I intend to send Jas. Anderson a letter by Mr. Robertson and L.J. Duval also if I have time to write one. Tell R. Teague that we are all well and generally have doold victuals since he left. I hope he will return in health. Dear wife farewell till next week Your loving husband till death.
To MrA.M.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Teague – Corporal Robert League, Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is liveing with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Rev. T. Robinson –

W. T. Farrow –

Lt Roberts – Lt. C.B. Roberts, Company B, Elford’s Third S.C. Reserves

Jas Anderson – Private – Company A – Ninth Reserves - (Jun., 1862 – Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

Lt. Durah – W.M. Dorroh - Third Lieutenant – Company A – Ninth Reserves (Jun., 1862 – Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

L.J. Duval -L.J. Duvall – Company D, Ninth S.C. Reserves (Jun, 1862- Jan. 1863) – Laurens District

Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore - W.T. Ashmore and his wife Nancy, neighbors of the McKittricks.

Mr. Mattox – John Mattox and his with Eliza are 49 and 47 years old and are neighbors of the McKittrick's living with a daughter Amanda

Mr. Stokes – Wm. Stokes is a 61 year old farmer living near the McKittricks. The family appears to consist of Mr. Stokes, his 47 year old wife Ann and three daughters Margaret, Martha and Virginia.

Thomas Goldsmith – First Sergeant, Company B, Elford’s Third Reserves – Company I, Sixteenth South Carolina

R. Teague – Corporal Robert League - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Grenville Regiment – Greenville Regiment – Sixteenth South Carolina has moved to the coast of North Carolina near Wilmington

Camp Goldsmith, January 19, 1863
Dear and beloved wife

I have just finished my dinner I now seat myself to commune with you a little season. O if I could only enjoy your lovely presence but this priviledge I must forgo for a while. I am through the mercy of heaven in good health I was vaccinated on last Monday it has not taken any effect yet I think I will be vaccinated again. You very likely have heard great tales bout the smallpox being in camp. There was thought to be one case here a few days ago it was sent to the Hospital and is now nearly well. And the excitement is abating. The patient had an eruption of the skin which resembled smallpox. The health of the Regt. is very good for the number of men that are here.

I heard by Mr. Wood that you were well last Thursday. I am anxiously waiting for a kind letter from you by Mr. Teague. O how I want to see the cheerful face of my dear wife and children. When you get this keep them all and remember me. We have some fine seasons here Rev. T. Robertson visited us last week and preached twice we had a solemn time on the last night there was some Twenty persons professed interest in the prayer’s of Gods people. The weather is and has been so cold that we cannot meet comfortably we had a Sermon on yesterday morning and in the evening a prayer meeting There are about people professors of Religion in our Regt., many of whom I hope are God serving men. My dear companion in the flesh I wish I could give up the things of time and sense and resign my case to the disposition of God and trust him for his grace more willingly than I fear I do yet I hope that I am not deceived in my conversion. I have felt Jesus precious to me since I came to this camp my friends call on me to officiate in public I fear that I am not worthy and my conscience reproves me if I disobey the call. I was sorry to hear of cousin McDowell death. I sympathyse with his widow and children. He commenced to shear (share) the toils and pleasures of married life after we did and he now is beneath the sod while we survive. Poor Janr is left to toil on through life alone I pray that we may escape this fate for a while. But this case is a great admonition on last Sunday evening three weeks ago I walk in company with him and other friends to visit another Regt. expecting to hear preaching but this we did not hear. He appeared in full health. How uncertain are all things here below I will endeavor to gat a letter to you on every Friday instead of Tuesday as it will not have to be on the way. I will wait till Robt. Teague returns before I finish this letter. My dear do the you can in fixing for a crop.

Jan. 20 – Dear wife I am still well. Mr. Teague arrived this evening safely and seems truly glad to hear from you and my dear little ones. I hope you are doing all things well. My dear I think you need not be uneasy about me taking small pox it is all a false alarm the patient is about well. I was vaccinated on yesterday. Do not allow yourself to be uneasy about me. I find our friends in Miss. Are distressed as well as we I do not exactly know how much you ought to give for a Negro boy you speak about I rather think you best? make a living trade to do so. I think you had better get advice from such men as Uncle Adam Stering, Egr. Thompson and C. Mr. Teague tells me that there will be a boy sold (by?)Roland Cotts. I want you to get good advice I believe I had rather have the property than money. If you buy you must pay off in cash as much as we have of Confederate money. I can borrow more, I think do the best you can. Your affectionate husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr. Wood – Nicholas Wood

Mr. Teague – Corporal Robert League - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Rev. T. Robinson –

McDowell – James McDowell was serving in Company C, of Elford’s Third – Company C was drawn from lower Greenville District and Upper Laurens District - James McDowell, Born: January 1, 1815; Died: January 11, 1863; Married Jane Elizabeth Peden, Born: November 12, 1823; Died: November 15, 1901 - Children - Mary (Mamie) Jane; Thomas Whitner; Callie Elizabeth; Margaret Sophronia; William Reid; Ella Telitha; Jane Wister. House of Alexander -The Peden's of North America, page 398

Janr McDowell – Jane McDowell

Uncle Adam Stering –

Egr. Thompson –

Rolan Cotts -

Camp Goldsmith January 25, 1863 Sunday Evening
Dear Wife

I seat myself (to) inform you how things are going on here and first I am through the mercy of God enjoying good health I have enjoyed good health ever since I left home. The health of the Regt. is good some cases of Measles and C. Wilis Johnson is now very sick at the hospital from the effects of the measles Middleton Jones is getting well I hear he is at the hospital. It is now determined that the small pox is at the Hospital some, five or six miles from here. Our authorities are taking care to keep it out of the camp I hope they will seceed we are all vaccinated I hope that God in his Providence will shield us from the maladies of this disease. I was vaccinated on last Monday week it took no effect on last Monday again it took but little effect the Dr. thought it best to revaccinate me again this morning I think it will take effect this time as he put it in my arm in three places you wrote that you were uneasy about me taking it. My dear do not distress yourself so much about me I hope that God will preserve me through all the trials that smite me. I have had the pleasure of hearing Rev. Banks from Chester preach and getting aquainted with him he is a Presbyterian and Chaplain of the Leoresty (Secrest) Regt. which are encamped near by us. I found Mr. Banks a very pleasant man his company was made moor interesting from the fact that he was an old acquaintace He stayed at my fathers house about 27 years ago he was a coledgema te (college mate) of Brother John and is acquainted with our Chester Teden (Chester Peden?) connection and has seen your brother Adam & C. he invited me to visit his quarters I intend to cultivate intercourse with him our Regt. was highly pleased with his sermon. I want you to vaccinate all our family if you have not done it before now perhaps you should repeat the operation until it will have no effect be sure not to neglect it you must favor Rose and Line when they are under the influence of vaccination. If you have been vaccinated in time past perhaps you had better try it again. My mess are all well. I heard a good sermon today from a neighborhood chaplain. Our Chaplain gains is going to leave us tomorrow he is going to North Carolina to preach and teach. I would like to be with you this day at Old Fairview but cannot enjoy this privilidge My dear I know you find your duties much increased by my absence but I hope you be supported in your work growing with family. I will prudently warn you my dear not to be afraid to let your children hear you pray you will never have a more convenient season to sustain the family altar in my absence than the present time. It would afford me pleasure to know that you had erected your altar. I do not know when we will be able to get home the Col. is gone to Charleston and will return this evening I suppose we will hear something about it soon. Our 90 days are out on the 10th of February but we are not certain that we will get home. Give my respects to Mr. Ashmore and tell him that his brother Jas. Is well. The weather is quite pleasant here now. We have had cold weather here a few days since. Moore tomorrow. 8 o’clock at night I did not intend to write until tomorrow but I have heard some good news the Col. has returned from Charleston and says that we will be disbanded to go home at the end of our time unless there is pressing need for men or at least all over 40 years of age. But I cannot but feel a little doubtful about it yet I truly hope that I will be allowed to see you and my dear children once more. I will let you know when I hear certainly. Our Chaplain preached his last sermon to us tonight we had a solemn time when he bid us farewell at the close of the service. Do the best you can I will start this to you tomorrow. I hope to get one tomorrow eve. Monday morning Jan. 26. I have just come from drill I am well and our mess also. I have nothing new this morning. My dear farewell for a while. Your loving husband till death
Samuel McKittrick

Wilis Johnson – W.J. Johnson, Elford’s 3rd South Carolina Reserves, Company C, Jun 1862 - Jan 1863 – There is a J.W. Johnson serving as a Corporal in Company I of the Sixteenth at the time of the surrender in North Carolina.

Middleton Jones – Maybe J.M. Jones, Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company B, (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863 )

Rev. Banks – Rev. William Banks was Chaplain of Secrest Regt. Andrew Jackson Secrest was Colonel of 6th South Carolina Reserves (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863). He had earlier served as the Lt. Col. of the Sixth South Carolina Volunteer Infantry. The Sixth Reserves was from Chester, Fairfield and York Districts.

Old Fairview – Fairview Presbyterian Church – Fountain Inn, S.C.

Mr. Ashmore - Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore - W.T. Ashmore and his wife Nancy, neighbors of the McKittricks.

Col. C.J. Elford – Colonel Commanding Third S.C. Reserves

The Chaplain is probably going to join the Sixteenth and preach to them. They are in North Carolina on the coast at this time.

Camp Goldsmith, Pocotaligo, S.C. January 27, 1863

The Christian
1
How happy is man who has chosen wisdom ways
To measure out his span to his God in prayer and praise
His God and his Bible are all that he requires
And to holiness of heart he constantly aspires
2
He rises in the morning with the lark he tunes his
And offer a tribute to his God in prayer and praise
And then to his labor he cheerfully repairs
With confidence believing that God will hear his prayer
3
What ever he engages in at home or abroad
His object is the honor and to glorify his God
With joy he hails the morning that rolls the Sabbath Morning
And in the Courts of Worship he’s ever to be found
4
His seat among his brethren he’s ever sure to fill
Low at the feet of Jesus to his master’s will
He claims his Father’s promises and ere doth bestow
His good for the promotion of righteousness below
5
In poverty he’s happy for he know he has a friend
That never will forsake him through time shall have an end
And thus you have a history of him from day to day
Religion is nor (no) mystery to those who read and pray
6
And when from his pillow he lies down to die
He’s happy for he knows that his Savior’s nigh ever
And when his labor’s ended his soul on wings of love
Flies away to realms of glory to reign with him above

Camp Goldsmith Sunday February 1st, 1863
Dear Wife

This Sabbath day finds me well I have been so. I received your kind letter on last Thursday evening I was gratified to hear that you were all well and doing so well I am glad to hear that John Adaline and Martha are getting along so well in their books that’s the way to go right on through them My dear I hope to see you and the children within two weeks moor. Our time will be out the 11th Inst. and all men over 40 years of age will be allowed to go home. I cannot now say exactly what time we will come home but unless we are pressed longer we will leave about the 10 or 11 of this month we may several days on the road. If everything goes on as we now hope it will you may expect me home about the 13th or 14th Inst. I know you will rejoice to hear this news and I will rejouic to beat this news and I will be glad as you can well be it is not yet known whether the men under 40 years of age will be allowed to go home or not. I suppose they will only go on a Furlough. They are allowed to choose their companies and Regts. under Beaureguard’s command. If the enemy remains quiet here all the Reserves will be Disbanded shortly. We had another Brigade inspection yesterday we had a grand display and while we were on the field a Courier brought the news to General Walker that we had whipped them out at Stono near Charleston the cheers and shouts of the Soldiers were almost (all most) terrific. At this time the roaring of guns is like distant thunder in (the) direction of Savannah suppose to be a distance there of 40 miles. I think you had better fatten the Mattox sow forth with and as to the Negro trade if the sale of any come on before I get home try and make a good bargain. Perhaps the Tedens will not be in a hurry about it you may let them know that I want such a boy and that I will likely soon be at home. Do as you think best and I will be satisfied your interest is mine. We miss our Chaplain although we have good social meetings. The small pox has not spread yet I am lead to believe it will not as that the whole matter is (a) mistake my vaccination will have no effect or has none as yet. The excitement has greatly abated in our Regt. I hope to yet know moor before I close and in my next letter to be able to guess near the time I will go to Greenville 6 o’clock at Noon. I have seated myself to give you a little moor news and first I have heard a good sermon this evening from the Rev. Norton, Chaplain of a company nearby us. Mr. Teague is writing on the board with me D.H. Burdett and Howard are all well and doing well. Half past 7 o’clock I have just head a sermon for Rev. Banks we had a good one now. I have sold my blue coat for $14.00. I am well this morning The firing I heard yesterday was an attack near Savannah I haven’t heard the result. Your Loving husband till death.
Samuel McKittrick

General Beauregard – General P.G.T. Beauregard

General Walker – General W.S. Walker – On January 1, 1863, General W.S. Walker was in command of the Confederate forces from the Ashepoo River south to Savannah.

Tedens – Pedens - There are only two Peden's who are substantial slave holders in the 1860 census of Greenville County and their holdings are under thirty slaves each. They are Scipio and Elizabeth, it is my belief that this is James Scipio Peden or J.S. Peden who is mentioned later in the letters and is killed in the Battle of Atlanta. He was born in March of 1821 and die on July 27, 1864. He was married to Elizabeth (Betsy) Mooney Stenhouse and is buried at Fairview.

Mattox sow – a pig identified by the name of the family who either owns it or sold it to McKittrick, we hope. – “kill the fatted cow or in this case sow, the prodigal son returns.” - Mr. Mattox – John Mattox and his with Eliza are 49 and 47 years old and are neighbors of the McKittrick's living with a daughter Amanda

Rev. Norton -

Mr. Teague – Corporal Robert League - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

D.H. Burdett is probably D.W. Burdett – D.W. is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as David Wilcott Burdett, he will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves. B. Wm. Burdett is the older brother and is listed as 16 in the 1860 census he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Howard – J.M. Howard

Rev. Banks – Rev. William Banks was Chaplain of Secrest Regt. Andrew Jackson Secrest was Colonel of 6th South Carolina Reserves (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863). He had earlier served as the Lt. Col. of the Sixth South Carolina Volunteer Infantry. The Sixth Reserves was from Chester, Fairfield and York Districts.

Camp Goldsmith Pocotaligo, February 8, 1863 Dear wife I seat myself this beautiful Sabbath day to inform you that I am through the mercy of heaven well. I was much disappointed on last Thursday when I received no letter from you as that is the time I should have gotten one I have received no letter yet. M.T. Fowler said that you left word for him to call at John Ridgers on Tuesday and bring a letter to me he called and saw no person at home but 2 children and they told him there was no letter then So among hands I got no letter He (Fowler) told me that you now at H. Thompsons on last Monday I suppose that you were all well not having heard from home I have less to write about I hope you are doing well I did hope to get home a few days ago but now I cannot say when I will be able to go. We are likely to be detained a longer time we are to have a Brigade parade this evening perhaps we will know something more about it. There is great anxity among the troops here. The Legislature may have done something in the matters. There has been an expectation of fighting along the coast for several days past but now the prospect is less than threatening. I hope that if we are detained it will be but for a shor(t) time. We must submit to what ever (is) laid upon us. If I could only be allowed to dwell with you and my dear children I crave no other higher privilidge upon earth but this is not allowed me at present in the providence of God. You lovely presence cannot be suplied by any other earthly blessing. I heard a sermon today from Rev. Banks 6 ½ o’clock at night. We have had our parade 3 Regiments namely Ryan’s Secrest and Elford’s Gen. Walker was present and made a strong appeal to (the) Regt. to volunteer for 30 days and followed by Col Elford when we move cas(e) made about 23 persons mostly officers step out from one Regt. 3 of whom from our company. The men did perceive the need of staying how at such an expense at home unless there was moore apparent danger. We now expect to be disbanded on
End of letter.

M Fowler – Moses T. Fowler - M.T. Fowler – Fowler, M. T., 1st Lieutenant, 3rd South Carolina State Troops Company C (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)- Moses T. Fowler is known as being the last man to occupy the lower half of Satan's pulpit or the clerk's place at Fairview Presbyterian. He died on March 24, 1889 and Married Amanda Richards, Born: April 13, 1841-Died: December 1, 1914. On page 246 of The Peden's of North American we find the following notation: Moses T. Fowler served nine months in the S.C. Militia during the War Between the States, Three months as First Lieutenant, then six months as Captain of his company; was transferred to Company E, Hampton Legion. This company of this famous legion was composed of at least two-thirds Peden Descendants. Moses T. Fowler was wounded in the shoulder at Riddle's Shop, Va. and surrendered with Lee. He like the father, John Peden, gave four sons to the Confederate cause, two on the altar of country. Robert A. Fowler, Company E, Hampton Legion - Killed at Seven Pines; John Thomas Fowler serving in the Second Louisiana, Jackson's Corps - Wounded at Second Manassas and Chancellorsville - Joined Company E, Hampton Legion. M. White Fowler serving with Company A, First S.C. Militia at the close of the war.

Jim Ridgers – probably Rodgers – There is a James R. Rodgers in the 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company A (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

H Thompson –

Rev. Banks – See Above

Ryan’s Regiment – 11th Regiment S.C. Reserves (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

Elford’s Regiment – 3rd Regiment S.C. Reserves (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

Secrest’s Regiment – 6th Regiment S.C. Reserves (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863)

Gen Walker – W.S. Walker

Camp Goldsmith, Pocotaligo, February 10, 1863
Dear wife

I am well, I did not intend to write to you any more but as we will not get home on Saturday I send you word to join teams with Mr. Teague’s people and sent to Greenville on Saturday evening you can find one or two horses and send food to feed the horses then until we arrive. Our Regt. Is disbanded and are only waiting for Transportation which we cannot get until Thursday if nothing occurs we will leave on Thursday and hope to get to Greenville on Saturday evening we may not until Sunday at all events we hope to get there soon D.W. Burdett had measles he starts in the morning he is just breaking out I think he will get on well I hope to see you soon. So I add no moor but subscribe myself your affectionate husband.
Samuel McKittrick

Mr Teague – Corporal Robert League - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

D.W. Burdett – is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as David Wilcott Burdett, he will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves. B. Wm. Burdett is the older brother and is listed as 16 in the 1860 census he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

Camp Scriven, Pocotaligo February 2, 1863
Dear wife

I seat myself to let you know that I am still here notwithstanding my adverse condition I am blessed with good health I have had a very hard march this morning we had to march about seven miles in the rain shoe mouth deep. We (are) now in ranks over seven hours and with a few minutes exception all the time on our feet I am now beginning to experience the hardships of soldiers life. This was Brigade Inspection day I saw the greatest Military display I have ever seen. There were on the field I suppose 3,000 men all in uniform with very few exceptions a fraction of (a) Brigade from North Carolina, Colonel Stevens Regiment, and several companies of Cavalry and some 12 or 15 pieces of artillery. I thought the reserves made a fine show but they (are) all perfectly ------- now. We are daily expecting an attack if we are there (it) will be a great slaughter of human life. My dear I received you letter of last Sunday yesterday evening you know the pleasure a letter brings I am glad to hear that you and my dear little ones are doing as well (as) you are I was also glad that you had returned safely from Laurens. But you left (me) in perfect ignorance in regard to my Affadavit whether you got it or not I am at a loss to know you stated that Duvall was told that all this was useless trouble I wish it were only so. My dear wife I think it doubtful whether I get off with it (the Affadavit) and still more so without it. I have been looking for it in a letter but have failed to see it. You must remember that I am not allowed to go before an enrolling officer I am confined here as on liable to conscription and that against rule or law I do not know nor can I find out whether or when I will get discharged. My dear of all the troubles of life which I have been called to pass through I feel this most severly I always felt like (I) had a country to serve and I tried to do it cheerfully but since my country has served me so cruelly I feel like it is hardly worth serving when I look around and see all the Reserves gone home who are over 40 and some under that for 15 days furlough but Elford’s Regt. and we (Elford) as I have good reason I had like to said facts to believe I understand in my detention here I am most miserably provided God forbid that I should harbor any unjust opinions of any person but all that speak about it here at least blame Elford. The other Cols. Took their Regts. home. I hear that Elford denies saying anything to Gen. Walker about taking ages up to 41 a letter was found on our old camp ground that he sent to send to inquire about taking them over when other Cols. stoped at 40. this letter as Mr. Ashmore knows was handed to me by Captain Bowers at Yorkville We all think it best and safer to keep this letter secret until we got off or until there (are) some changes as it might injury us badly to be made public as the General’s name is to it and besides Elford might use it to our injury as he is so tuchy.

My dear wife I will send it home to you as it might get lost if we get confused I charge you to let no boddy see it and say nothing to any one about it until I come home or until it will do to reveal it you will see what Elford say to the General and his reply on back which appears Walker did not think certain that men were liable to us this letter was sent out 2 days before our ages were taken. Which plainly shows Elfords position. As R Teague is acquainted with Elfords tricks you may show him the letter and swear him not to betray its contents. I know he will do to trust be cautious to keep the writing on the back from rubbing out as it serve(s) to show Elfords conduct. I know you have heard something about this ere this time. I am grieved about you and the children and any unjust treatment so much that I am tempted to think I have nothing besides my family to live for I sometimes fear I shall never see you if not I shall keep you vivid in my mind until I am hushed in death as the best of all women. O how often do I fancy you and the children around our little altar but I your husband is missing. May the God of all Mercy protect both you and me and all us to enjoy a happy reunion.

March 1st, Dear wife I am still well I was on guard last night and got relieved from that at 9 o’clock. We then had gun inspection at 10 and against we get though with our duties it was about 1:00 o’clock. The Holy Sabbath brings with it no santity in camp since I cam here I have no Religious privileges and many temptations to endure. I think of the precious opportunities that passed unimproved at home as also I think of the fine living or plenty of good victuals well cooked that (I) did not rightly appreciate I now live on what I would neglect at home and scanty at that. But I ought to be thankful that I am able to eat what I get. I do truly hope to eat some cake and bacon and molasses with you yet I have no flour since I left the other Regt. I am living hard but I will not complain. And I could endure it much better if I was here lawfully. It gives me pleasure to know that you are writing to me today. We have consulted this morning about the above Elford letter and we have concluded not to send it as it it might not go openly by mail. So you can keep this secret. If any of us go home we will bring it. We hear of no Battle yet although this the day set. Tell all the children to go ahead in their books Give my respects to R. Teague and family, Mr. Ashmore, Mr. Stokes, Mr and Mrs. Mattox and family. Jas Ashmore is well and J.R. Stone.

Monday Morning March 2d Dear Mary I am well this morning I must start this within a few minutes. We have had no Battle yet no person can tell when we may have. Try and do the best you can. I can get no information about my case it is very strange the way our authorities set we are going to write to the Governor about this matter Rayfi a Hiss, Turner and Jeffy for me. Your loving husband

Samuel McKittrick

This letter is dated February 2, 1863, however we know Sergeant McKittrick was still writing from Camp Goldsmith at that time. Camp Screven letters begin on the 22nd and this may well be a continuation of that letter.

Camp Screven – is probably located on the Screven Canal, an area very well known to Captain Elliott and the Beaufort Light Artillery

Brigade of North Carolina – Clingman’s and one other small North Carolina Brigade appear to have been on duty on the coast at this time.

Col. Stevens Regt. – 24th South Carolina

Elford – Colonel C.J. Elford, Commanding Third South Carolina Reserves

For Colonel Elford's side of this story read, “Elford to the Public”


General Walker – General W.S. Walker

Mr. Ashmore – Mr. and Mrs. Ashmore - W.T. Ashmore and his wife Nancy, neighbors of the McKittricks.

Captain Bowers at Yorkville – There appears to be only one Captain John Bowers in S.C. service. He is John E. Bowers serving in the First Regiment Charleston Reserves as Captain of Company G.

R. Teague – Robert League, see earlier notation - also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Mr. Stokes – Stokes is a 61 year old farmer living near the McKittricks. The family appears to consist of Mr. Stokes, his 47 year old wife Ann and three daughters Margaret, Martha and Virginia.

Mr. and Mrs. Mattox – Mr. Mattox – John Mattox and his with Eliza are 49 and 47 years old and are neighbors of the McKittrick's living with a daughter Amanda

Jas. Ashmore – there is a J.S. Ashmore who served in 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company C. (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863). More importantly James S. Ashmore shows up in Company B of the First S.C. Sharpshooters, a place where McKittrick is forced to serve after he was pressed. He is probably the brother of the Ashmore family that live near the Mckittrick family.

J.R. Stone – there is a James Stone who also served in the 3rd South Carolina State Troops, Company C (Jun 1862 - Jan 1863) – there is a John Stone who appears on the roster of Company C of the First S.C. Sharpshooters but there are a number of men named Stone serving with the First Sharpshooters.

Camp Scriven, Pocotaligo, February 22, 1863
Dear wife

I am through the blessing of God well I have nothing corry (current) to write you. We are here and trying to do the best we can. My dear wife I cannot now say when I will get home if I ever do. I have been so shamefully treated by detaining me here that I have but little to hope for. James Ashmore sent his Affadvit to Headquarters last Monday, he has heard no more of it since. I received a affadavit from Capt. Roberts on last Friday stating that I enrolled my age in his company as being 41 years old next March and that I did not regard myself as a conscript I also sent a recommendation or a statement of my condition with it (the affadavit) on yesterday to the General. I have heard no more of it I fear that my captain will do all he can to hold us here, although I hope all will be in vain. There has been nothing done in any of the cases I mean those we who were detained I exspect mother’s affadavit soon. I will try if there is any justice in it. If the Col. That if Col. Elford had acted in good faith to his Regt. We would have gone home. As much as other Cols. Of Reserve Regts. carried their men home. We cant see how we are kept here when other men under 41 are not held in service I yet hope and believe that we cant be held. There is something very strange in the matter. We are quartered where we were when Mr. Ashmore was here. Our fare is rather coarse and stale and we have few dishes to eat out of except of our own manufacture. But I try to be contented knowing it could be worse I wish you could see us dine once. One large dishpan with boiled beef and rice set in the middle of the table each man with his wooden spoon and pocketknife makes his own headway or in the absence of rice a large cake of cornbread is place in the dish. We draw a pound of bacon once a week each and a small allowance of rice daily a week.

My dear do not be too uneasy about me as I know you are I will try to get on someway you propose to send me something from home. I wish it was so you could but we are daily expecting to move we might not never get the benefit of it as this company is not allowed much baggage. This day was set apart for an attack but it has not come yet. We are well prepared here now 2 regiments and one battery have arrived since the reserves left we have been under marching orders for 4 or 5 days but I now begin to think we may not have a battle just now although there is no telling.

My dear I received your letter of last Sunday. It gave joy and pain. My very heart bleeds when I think of you and my dear children. I know you hae a trying time of it but do the best you can and trust in God. I hope all will work right I often remember you at a Throne of Grace. If I never see you I hope to meet you where turmoils are ended. I wish I had your portrait to cheer me in my lonely hours. Tell Mr. Ashmore that his brother is and give him my respects. R. Teague D.W. Burditt and all inquiring friends tell them I (am) trying to do the best I can I am fearful you have had a hard time going to Laurens but I know you did it cheerfully I think that something will be done in our cases before a great while the weather is quite pleasant here. We have no heavy duty to do now. I have just heard of more troops being on their way here. Tell Turner I am glad he is a good boy and all rest learn so well. I suppose John will have to oversee in case I cannot get home soon I want him to go to school if possible. J.R. Stone sends you his respects.

Monday morning February 23

I am well this morning Sunday has come and gone and no battle yet more troops arrived last night I may have to stay in the . Tell R. Teague who ever got the small spider and lid that m(a)y want it. Dear wife do the best you can I have heard no preaching since I came to this Co. on last night I witnessed a strange meeting among the negros here there form of worship appeared simple and sincere. Farewell my dear wife be sure to write often.
Samuel McKittrick

Camp Screven - probably located near the Screven Canal.

James Ashmore – is probably the brother of the Ashmore's who are neighbors to the Mckittricks.

R. Teague – Corporal Robert League appears to have been old enough to escape being pressed into service. League is also a neighbor of the McKittrick's, he is listed in the 1860 census as a farmer, 47 years old. He is living with his wife Mary and his sons William P. and Joseph who are 16 and son Thomas who is 12 and two younger daughters.

Capt. Roberts – Sergeant McKittrick’s Captain, Company B, Third S.C. Reserves

Col Elford – Sergeant McKittrick’s Colonel, Commander of the Third S.C. Reserves

D.W. Burditt - is the son of Jesse Burdett, a neighbor of McKittrick. Listed as David Wilcott Burdett, he will also serve in Company I of the Sixteenth. Jesse will serve with McKittrick in Company B of Elford's Third Reserves. B. Wm. Burdett is the older brother and is listed as 16 in the 1860 census he serves in Company I of the Sixteenth South Carolina.

It appears that Sergeant McKittrick has been conscripted, or in this case pressed, a term that dates to another war, when Americans fought the English over the issue of pressing sailors.

A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF S. McKITTRICK

Camp Haywood, Pocotaligo Beaufort Dist. So.Ca. March 12th 1863

“My father George McKittrick emigrated from Ireland when about ten years of age with his Father who settled in Newbury Dist. So.Ca. he in after life became the husband of Mary Yeargin of Newbury Dist. So. Ca. He died in the month of Sept. or October 1844 aged about 69 years. My mother still survives. I have two brothers, four sisters of whom I am the youngest, except one brother. I was born on 28th March 1822 in Laurens Dist. I attached myself to the Presbyterian Church at Rocky Spring Laurens Dist. In the month of June 1841. In October 1847 I was elected and ordained a ruling Elder of that church. In August 1845 I formed an acquaintance with Miss. Mary Ann youngest daughter of John and Rebecca Stinnes of Greenville Dist., So.Ca. which matured in Matrimony on 10th of November 1846.

I resided in Laurens Dist. Until December 1851, when I removed to Greenville, So. Ca. I then moved my church membership to Fairview Greenville Dist. In December 27th, 1861, (The United States being in Revolution) I volunteered in defense of my county I was elected Captain of a company and on the 24th of January 1862 I left the comforts of home to endure a soldier’s life. I remained in service until the second of May, 1862 at which time the “Conscript Act” went into effect. Having a dependant family I refused the position of Captain in the reorganization in the 16th Regt. to which I belonged and went home. In Nov. 12th 1863 the Reserves were called into service on the 12th Nov. I again left home for the camp in 3d Regt. of Reserves 1863 under the command of Col. C. I. Elford in Company B Captain T.B. Roberts in which co. I have a Seargeants office. On the 10th February 1863 the Regt. Was disbanded. When all men under 40 years of age were conscripted into service, and all over that were allowed to go home. I lacking about six weeks of 41 did not suppose I was liable according to the call. But by some misconstruction or ursurpation of power I with some 40 or 50 others was assigned to other companies. Myself and Four other friends were assigned to Captain Allston’s Sharpshooters (Company B, First S.C. Sharpshooters). We are awaiting the decision of our contested liability. Which I still hope will give me justice. I feel that I have received by this act indignant treatment and that too, from these who should have been my friends. Had my officers all acted in good faith I think my situation this might be different. But the Adder is sometimes poisoned by his own sting. So they that dig pits for others sometimes may fall there in. If in my opinion is right I render unto Seacer the things which are his. If I am wrong I hope to see my error.

In reviewing my past life I find I have neglected many opportunities of improving my own time and meloriating the condition of myself and others But I pray the Lord to forgive my past Follies and aid me in time to com and finally prepare me for eternity.

To my beloved wife Mary

Samuel McKittrick


To Return to the Letters Index, follow General Gist; to go home, follow the flag.